Snana Yatra in Odisha commemorates the appearance of Lord Jagannath

The Snana Yatra is a sacred festival for the devotees of Lord Jagannath. It is a 'bathing festival' celebrated on a full moon day in the Hindu month of Jyeshtha

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Snana Yatra
Jagannath, Balabhadra and Devi Subhadra. This year, Snana Yatra was on June 9 in Odisha. Wikimedia
  • Snana Yatra is a sacred festival to commemorate Lord Jagannath
  • It is celebrated by his devotees on the full moon day in the Hindu month of Jyestha 
  • On this day, the deities Jagannath, Subhadra, Balabharda, and Madanmohan are ceremoniously bathed and decorated

June 09, 2017: On the holy festival of Snana Yatra, large crowds of devotees come to the Jagannath Temple in Odisha to commemorate the appearance of Lord Jagannath. It takes place in the Hindu month of Jyestha on a Purnima (full moon) day. This year, it was on June 9.

Lord Jagannath is the deity worshiped by Buddhists and Hindus. Lord Jagannath means the ‘Lord of the Universe’. Most worshippers and be found in Odisha, West Bengal, Jharkhand, Bihar, Gujarat, Assam, and Manipur.

A day before the Snana Yatra, the images of Jagannath, Sudarshana, Balabhadra, and Subhadra are taken to the procession which is called the snana-vedi (bathing pandal). The procession is known as ‘Pahandi’ in the local language.

Snana Yatra
Shri Jagannath Temple, Puri. Wikimedia

The proceedings are known to be sacred. The Devotees strongly believe that getting a glimpse of this bathing ceremony of the Lord will wash away their sins. Hence, the ceremony attracts people from different places in large numbers. The bathing platform is 76 feet high which makes it visible to people outside the temple as well.

The snana-vedi is beautifully decorated with traditional paintings of trees and gardens. The deities are decorated with flowers. The bathing water is ritually purified water drawn from the northern well of the temple only once on this day of the year.

After the bathing ritual, the ceremony is concluded by dressing the Lord Jagannath in an elephant headgear symbolic of Lord Ganesha.

– by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394