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We Fact-checks All Political Ads, Claims Snapchat

According to experts, the onus is now on Facebook to take action which has become a platform for spreading misleading and fake political ads

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Snapchat is reportedly planning to launch more
Snapchat in a Smartphone. IANS

While Facebook faces the ire over presence of misleading and fake political ads on its platform, Snapchat has said it fact-checks all political ads and does not allow misinformation to sneak through its platform.

Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel said the company subjects all advertising to review, including political advertising.

“What we try to do is create a place for political ads on our platform, especially because we reach so many young people and first-time voters, we want them to be able to engage with the political conversation, but we don’t allow things like misinformation to appear in that advertising,” Spiegel told CNBC on Monday.

Facebook recently allowed US President Donald Trump’s campaign office to post a fake ad about Democrat presidential hopeful Joe Biden on its platform.

Snapchat Logo. VOA

Snapchat’s comment on political ads came after Twitter on November 15 officially banned all kinds of political ads from its platform.

No political content will be promoted from candidates, parties, governments or officials, public accounts committees (PACs) and certain political non-profit groups, said Twitter.

“Twitter globally prohibits the promotion of political content. We have made this decision based on our belief that political message reach should be earned, not bought,” the micro-blogging platform said on Friday.

Also Read: Facebook, Instagram Down Again, Users Clueless: Report

On October 31, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey had tweeted: “While internet advertising is incredibly powerful and very effective for commercial advertisers, that power brings significant risks to politics.”

According to experts, the onus is now on Facebook to take action which has become a platform for spreading misleading and fake political ads. (IANS)

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Researchers Associate Social Media Use to Eating Disorder in Adolescents

Social media use linked to eating disorder in children

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Eating disorder due to social media
Excessive use of Social media platforms such as Instagram and Snapchat is linked with eating disorder among children. Pixabay

Parents, take a note. Researchers have found that excessive use of social media, particularly platforms with a strong focus on image posting and viewing such as Snapchat and Instagram, is associated with eating disorder in young adolescents.

For the study, published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders, researchers examined data on 996 grade 7 and 8 adolescents.

“While a range of studies have focused on the impact of social media on body image, this is the first to examine the relationship between specific social media platforms and disordered eating behaviours and thoughts,” said study lead author Simon Wilksch from Flinders University in Australia.

Also, most other studies had focused on older adolescents or young-adult women, he said.

Eating disorder in teenagers
Adolescents develop eating disorder due to meal skipping. Pixabay

The study on associations between disordered eating and social media use among young adolescent girls and boys suggested that much more needed to be done to increase resilience in young people to become less adversely impacted by social media pressures, Wilksch added.

During the study, the research team found behaviours related to disordered eating were reported by 51.7 per cent of girls and 45 per cent of boys, with strict exercise and meal skipping being the most common.

Of these, 75.4 per cent girls and 69.9 per cent boys had at least one social media account, and Instagram was the most common.

Also Read- Fake News Spreads Like Wildfire On Social Media

According to the study, greater number of social media accounts and greater time spent on them were associated with a higher likelihood of disordered eating, thoughts and behaviours.

The researchers are launching an Australia-wide trial of the Media Smart Online programme designed to combat such pressures. (IANS)