Monday October 22, 2018
Home India Social Media ...

Social Media becomes important tool in radicalisation of youths

0
//
200
Teenagers
Republish
Reprint

New Delhi: Social media was an “important tool” being used by terrorist organisations to radicalise youths across India and abroad, police chiefs of India’s three metropolitan cities warned on Saturday.

Mumbai Commissioner of Police Ahmed Javed shared his views in this matter at the Aaj Tak agenda conclave in New Delhi.

The danger of radicalisation or indoctrination now has a new aspect. The medium to expand it has been changed speedily due to the intervention of social media and electronic medium, he said.

He said that there two kinds of thoughts prevailed in youngsters – those who are fairly impressive and those who are perceived.

A lot of youngsters based on reality but most of them on perception. Four youngsters of our land went to the Middle East recently to join IS (Islamic State).

“We tried to find out (why) and knew that social media is one of the most important tools to radicalise them,” Javed said.

Bengaluru Police Commissioner NS Megharikh also asserted that social media is really working as an alarming tool for the indoctrination of youngsters as they are more in touch with his medium.

Bengaluru is a very technical city. The role of social media in the indoctrination of youths is different from the traditional medium. Local issues are used through social media for the radicalization of people,

Delhi Police Commissioner BS Bassi said that terrorism was not a new danger for India.

The things and medium have been changed. In the past telephonic conversation and letters were used to indoctrinate youths. Now Facebook and WhatsApp are being used as a tool for his purpose,” he said at the conclave. (IANS)

(Picture Courtesy: www.superlobby.com)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Twitter Gets Investigated By Ireland Over Data Collection

Both Facebook and Twitter have faced lawsuits for collecting data on links shared in private messages

0
Twitter CEO
Twitter on a smartphone device. VOA

 Twitter is reportedly facing an investigation by privacy regulators in Ireland over data collection in its link-shortening system, the media reported.

Privacy regulators in Ireland have launched an investigation into exactly how much data Twitter collects from t.co, its URL-shortening system, The Verge reported late on Saturday.

The investigation stems from a request made by UK professor Michael Veale under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), a comprehensive European privacy law under which EU citizens have a right to request any data collected on them from a given company.

Facebook, Twitter
Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, left, accompanied by Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey are sworn in before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on ‘Foreign Influence Operations and Their Use of Social Media Platforms’ on Capitol Hill. VOA

But when Veale made that request to Twitter, the company claimed it had no data from its link-shortening service. The professor was sceptical, and wrote to the relevant privacy regulator to see if Twitter was holding back some of his data.

Now, that investigation seems to be underway. The investigation, first reported by Fortune, is confirmed in a letter obtained by The Verge, sent to Veale by the office of the Irish Data Privacy Commissioner, the report said.

Initially designed as a way to save characters in the limited space of a tweet, link-shortening has also proved to be an effective tool at fighting malware and gathering rudimentary analytics.

Twitter
Twitter Chief Executive Officer Jack Dorsey testifies before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on foreign influence operations and their use of social media on Capitol Hill. VOA

Those analytics services can also present a significant privacy risk when used in private messages.

Also Read: Facebook Tackles Fake News, Deletes Almost 800 Accounts

Both Facebook and Twitter have faced lawsuits for collecting data on links shared in private messages, although no wrong-doing was conclusively established in either case. (IANS)