Tuesday January 21, 2020

Society Can’t Accept Negative Traits in Heroes, Says Nawazuddin Siddiqui

" I love doing challenging roles. With each film, I want to try something new. I hate doing roles in my comfort zone... I want to be a versatile actor. Now I look up to more new, different and challenging roles," he added

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Nawazuddin Plans To Start Farming NExt Month With His Brother. Flickr
Nawazuddin Plans To Start Farming NExt Month With His Brother. Flickr

Actor Nawazuddin Siddiqui has been praised for his portrayal of Bal Thackeray in “Thackeray”, but the movie, based on late Shiv Sena supremo who had a controversial political career, has been slammed by some critics for being biased. The critically acclaimed actor says Indian audiences do not like to see the protagonist in shades of grey and that if only the negative side of the protagonist is reflected on the big screen, this will severly impact the box office.

Addressing the critical reviews of the film, Nawazuddin told IANS in a telephonic interview: “For the past 40-50 years, we have been continuously presenting our heroes in a good light. The audience does not like to see the protagonist with grey shades. If I portray the only negative side of the protagonist, then it will not run at the box office.”

“Our society is not ready to see the negative traits in the heroes. My previous films ‘Manto’ and ‘Raman Raghav 2.0’ did not perform well. I tried my best to present the characters in those films without any polishing, but with lukewarm responses… I realised that our audience is not ready to see our heroes with negative characteristics.”

Keeping aside the critical reviews of “Thackeray”, Nawazuddin Siddiqui is “overwhelmed” to get his first biggest opening movie to date as a solo lead. The film registered over Rs 6 crore on Day 1 of its release (January 25).

“I am overwhelmed with the responses and love which I am receiving from people. I am thankful to all of them. With ‘Thackeray’, I got my first biggest opening as the solo lead role. I am honoured and blessed that I got an opportunity to play Balasahebji on screen.”

But the 44-year-old also said he does not like “giving much attention to box office collections”.

Nawazuddin Siddiqui Buys A Plot To Farm. Flickr
Majority of society in a time warp: Nawazuddin Siddiqui. Flickr

“Honestly speaking, I don’t pay much heed to a film’s collection and numbers. But it is a weird place, many people judge films on the basis of the collection, no matter what the content is.

“So many films have been made in our industry in which actors have performed well, but the film did not do well in terms of collections…and then they got declared as flops. And there are also so many films in which actors didn’t perform well but the film turned out to be the biggest hit just because it collected a good amount at the box office…weird. So, in such scenarios I also can’t totally overlook the box office collection of the films.”

Talking about the film’s success, Nawazuddin Siddiqui said that “Thackeray” has motivated him to keep doing “challenging roles” in future projects.

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“It feels good that when your work is appreciated and now ‘Thackeray’ is doing so well, it is inspiring me to keep pushing my limits and do more challenging roles on screen.

“I love doing challenging roles. With each film, I want to try something new. I hate doing roles in my comfort zone… I want to be a versatile actor. Now I look up to more new, different and challenging roles,” he added. (IANS)

Next Story

Here’s how you can Appear More Competent Through your Clothing

Secret to appear more competent hidden in your clothing

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Competent clothing
A richer clothing can help you look more competent. Lifetime Stock

People tend to instantly judge others as more competent if they come dressed in “richer” clothing, says a study that warned that such economic cues are hard to ignore.

In nine studies conducted by researchers, people rated the competence of faces wearing different upper-body clothing.

Clothing perceived as “richer” by an observer — whether it was a T-shirt, sweater, or other top — led to higher competence ratings of the person pictured than similar clothes judged as “poorer,” the researchers found.

Given that competence is often associated with social status, the findings, published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour, suggest that low-income individuals may face hurdles in relation to how others perceive their abilities — simply from looking at their clothing.

“Poverty is a place rife with challenges. Instead of respect for the struggle, people living in poverty face a persistent disregard and disrespect by the rest of society,” said study co-author Eldar Shafir, Professor at Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University in the US.

competent fashion
Competence is often associated with social status and it is reflected through clothing. Lifetime Stock

“We found that such disrespect — clearly unfounded, since in these studies the identical face was seen as less competent when it appeared with poorer clothing — can have its beginnings in the first tenth of a second of an encounter,” Shafir said.

The researchers began with images of 50 faces, each wearing clothes rated as “richer” or “poorer” by an independent group of judges.

Based on those ratings, the researchers selected 18 black and 18 white face-clothing pairs displaying the most prominent rich-poor differences. These were then used across the nine studies.

Participants were then presented with half of the faces wearing “richer” upper-body clothing, and the other half with “poorer” clothing.

The researchers found that across the studies faces were judged as significantly more competent when the clothing was perceived as “richer.”

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This judgment was made almost instantaneously and also when more time was provided.

When warned that clothing had nothing to do with competence, or explicitly asked to ignore what the person in the photo was wearing, the biased competency judgments persisted. (IANS)