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Could our solar system be made of bubbles?

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Solar system could have formed in the bubbles produced by a giant, long-dead star
Could our solar system be formed of bubbles around the massive star? wikimedia commons
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New York, Dec 26, 2017: Floating a new theory about the birth of our solar system, a new study says that it could have formed in the bubbles produced by a giant, long-dead star which was more than 40 to 50 times the size of our own Sun.

Despite the many impressive discoveries humans have made about the universe, scientists are yet to come to a consensus about the birth story of our solar system.

The general prevailing theory is that our solar system formed billions of years ago near a supernova.

But the new scenario, detailed in the Astrophysical Journal, instead begins with a giant type of star called a Wolf-Rayet star.

They burn the hottest of all stars, producing tonnes of elements which are flung off the surface in an intense stellar wind.

As the Wolf-Rayet star sheds its mass, the stellar wind plows through the material that was around it, forming a bubble structure with a dense shell.

“The shell of such a bubble is a good place to produce stars,” because dust and gas become trapped inside where they can condense into stars, said study co-author Nicolas Dauphas, Professor at University of Chicago in the US.

The researchers estimate that one to 16 per cent of all Sun-like stars could be formed in such stellar nurseries.

The study addresses a nagging cosmic mystery about the abundance of two elements in our solar system compared to the rest of the galaxy.

Meteorites left over from the early solar system suggests there was a lot of aluminium-26.

In addition, studies increasingly suggest we had less of the isotope iron-60.

This brings scientists up short, because supernovae produce both isotopes.

“It begs the question of why one was injected into the solar system and the other was not,” said co-author Vikram Dwarkadas from University of Chicago.

This brought the scientists to Wolf-Rayet stars, which release lots of aluminium-26, but no iron-60.

As for the fate of the giant Wolf-Rayet star, the researchers believe that its life ended long ago, likely in a supernova explosion or a direct collapse to a black hole. (IANS)

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Astronomers Found Ancient Star Formed By Big Bang

This suggests that it could be as little as one generation removed from the beginning of the universe, the researchers noted

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Astronomers discover ancient star formed by Big Bang, pixabay

A team of astronomers have found what could be one of the universe’s oldest stars, almost entirely made of materials formed by the Big Bang.

Residing in the same part of the Milky Way galaxy as our own solar system, the star is believed to be up to 13.5 billion years old which is evidenced by its extremely low metal content, or metallicity, Xinhua news agency reported.

According to co-author Andrew Casey, it was previously believed that the first stars that formed in the universe could not possibly still exist today.

“The findings are significant because for the first time we have been able to show direct evidence that very ancient, low mass stars do exist, and could survive until the present day without destroying themselves,” Casey said.

Keplar, NASA
According to co-author Andrew Casey, it was previously believed that the first stars that formed in the universe could not possibly still exist today. VOA

The metallicity of stars increases as they are born and die, in a cycle which results in the creation of more and more heavy metals, with the Earth’s sun being around 100,000 generations down that line and holding a metal content roughly equal to 14 Jupiters.

Stars created at the beginning of the universe, however, would have consisted entirely of elements like hydrogen, helium and small amounts of lithium – meaning the extremely low metallicity of the newly discovered star, about the same as the planet Mercury.

This suggests that it could be as little as one generation removed from the beginning of the universe, the researchers noted.

Also Read- Artificial Intelligence Will Match Humans By 2062: Experts

Up until around 1990, scientists believed that only massive stars could have formed in the early stages of the universe, and could never be observed because they burn through their fuel so quickly and die.

However, the new study has shown that it is possible for low mass stars to last as long as the 13 billion years since the Big Bang — Red Dwarf stars for instance, which have a fraction of the mass of the sun, are thought to live for trillions of years. (IANS)