Monday April 22, 2019
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Sony Unveils The World’s First 48MP Smartphone Sensor

The company plans to start shipping samples of the sensor this September, with a unit price of 3,000 yen ($27 or a little over Rs 1,800) each

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Sony
Available for Rs 1.6 lakh, the camcorder is capable of capturing 4K high resolution images, the company said in a statement. (IANS)

Taking the smartphone camera war to an entirely new level, Sony on Monday introduced world’s first 48MP sensor that will debut in September this year, probably with Sony devices.

The stacked CMOS image sensor “IMX586” features a pixel count of 48 effective megapixels and an ultra-compact pixel size of 0.8-micron pixels, the company wrote in a blog post.

“These days, high-end smartphone models require even greater imaging quality from their cameras. The new Sony sensor features 48 effective megapixels — a pixel count which rivals that of high-performance SLR cameras, making it possible to capture beautiful, high-resolution images even with a smartphone,” the company said.

Currently, the highest resolution camera sensor — 40MP — is available in Huawei P20 Pro and Nokia Lumia 1020. Apple has long used Sony to supply its camera sensors.

The new image sensor comes with Sony’s built-in original exposure control technology and signal processing functionality that enables real-time output and a range four times greater than conventional units.

Sony
The new Sony sensor features 48 effective megapixels — a pixel count which rivals that of high-performance SLR cameras, making it possible to capture beautiful, high-resolution images even with a smartphone. (IANS)

It uses the “Quad Bayer” colour filter array to incorporate high sensitivity and high resolution in the images.

“The new product achieved a world-first ultra-compact pixel size of 0.8 µm, making it possible to pack 48 effective megapixels onto a 1/2-type (8.0 mm diagonal) unit, thereby supporting enhanced imaging on smartphone cameras,” the company informed.

Original Sony exposure control technology and signal processing functionality are built into the image sensor, enabling real-time output and a superior dynamic range that is four times greater than conventional products.

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“Even scenes with both bright and dark areas can be captured with minimal highlight blowout or loss of detail in shadows while viewing the image on the smartphone display,” Sony said.

The company plans to start shipping samples of the sensor this September, with a unit price of 3,000 yen ($27 or a little over Rs 1,800) each. (IANS)

Next Story

UN: Geneva Can Improve the Health of Citizens Using Digital Technology

Chief WHO scientist Soumya Swaminathan said increased availability and use of digital technology offers new opportunities to improve people's health

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health, citizens, digital technology
FILE - A doctor uses a smartphone to take a photo of a child with facial deformity before surgery at the Vietnam Cuba hospital in Hanoi, Vietnam. VOA

The World Health Organization (WHO) has issued its first guidelines on digital health intervention.

The U.N. agency said governments can improve the health of their citizens by using digital technology to make health systems more efficient and responsive to their patients. The United Nations said 51 percent of the world’s population has access to broadband internet service.

Chief WHO scientist Soumya Swaminathan said increased availability and use of digital technology offers new opportunities to improve people’s health.

health
Chief WHO scientist Soumya Swaminathan said increased availability and use of digital technology offers new opportunities to improve people’s health. Pixabay

She told VOA the technology enables people, even in the remotest settings, to leapfrog into the development of a more effective, inclusive health system. With the use of mobile phones, computers and laptops, she said it is possible to bypass the intervening stages many countries have had to go through.

“So, a health worker in Congo can directly start using a mobile phone if the government is able to provide one to the health worker and get away from filling 30 paper registers, which occupy about one-third of front-line health workers time,” she added.

New recommendations

The new guidelines include 10 recommendations on how governments can use digital technology for maximum impact on their health systems.

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The new guidelines include 10 recommendations on how governments can use digital technology for maximum impact on their health systems. Pixabay

A WHO scientist specializing in digital innovations and research, Garrett Mehl, said the recommendations deal with issues such as birth notification.

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“Knowing that a baby has been born is critical to knowing how to provide vaccinations; knowing that the mother needs different post-natal care visits,” he said. “But without knowing that there was a birth that has happened, it is difficult to trigger those events in the health system.”

The guidelines also address privacy concerns.They have recommendations for ensuring that sensitive data, such as issues of sexual and reproductive health, are protected and not put at risk. (VOA)