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Soon your Smartphone can be charged by Swiping Fingers, says new Research

The “nanogenerator” was able to operate an LCD touch screen, 20 LED lights and a flexible keyboard with the device and without a battery

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Researchers at Michigan State University say they've developed a film that can turn swiping into energy for electronic devicess. (Mich. St.)- VOA News

Delhi, Dec 13, 2016: One day soon, your smartphone could be charged by swiping fingers, according to new research.

Writing in the journal Nano Energy, researchers from Michigan State University say they have developed a film-like device “to harvest energy from human motion.”

The researchers say the “nanogenerator” was able to operate an LCD touch screen, 20 LED lights and a flexible keyboard with the device and without a battery.

The film is made using a silicone wafer upon which thin layers of silver, polyimide and polypropylene ferroelectret are added. Ions are added and create energy when “the device is compressed by human motion.”

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“What I foresee, relatively soon, is the capability of not having to charge your cell phone for an entire week, for example, because that energy will be produced by your movement,”said Nelson Sepulveda, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering and lead investigator of the project..”

Furthermore, researchers say the device is “lightweight, flexible, biocompatible, scalable, low-cost and robust.”

Moreover, they add that the device becomes more powerful when it is folded.

“Each time you fold it you are increasing exponentially the amount of voltage you are creating,” Sepulveda said. “You can start with a large device, but when you fold it once, and again, and again, it is now much smaller and has more energy. Now it may be small enough to put in a specially made heel of your shoe so it creates power each time your heel strikes the ground.” (VOA)

 

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UN: Geneva Can Improve the Health of Citizens Using Digital Technology

Chief WHO scientist Soumya Swaminathan said increased availability and use of digital technology offers new opportunities to improve people's health

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health, citizens, digital technology
FILE - A doctor uses a smartphone to take a photo of a child with facial deformity before surgery at the Vietnam Cuba hospital in Hanoi, Vietnam. VOA

The World Health Organization (WHO) has issued its first guidelines on digital health intervention.

The U.N. agency said governments can improve the health of their citizens by using digital technology to make health systems more efficient and responsive to their patients. The United Nations said 51 percent of the world’s population has access to broadband internet service.

Chief WHO scientist Soumya Swaminathan said increased availability and use of digital technology offers new opportunities to improve people’s health.

health
Chief WHO scientist Soumya Swaminathan said increased availability and use of digital technology offers new opportunities to improve people’s health. Pixabay

She told VOA the technology enables people, even in the remotest settings, to leapfrog into the development of a more effective, inclusive health system. With the use of mobile phones, computers and laptops, she said it is possible to bypass the intervening stages many countries have had to go through.

“So, a health worker in Congo can directly start using a mobile phone if the government is able to provide one to the health worker and get away from filling 30 paper registers, which occupy about one-third of front-line health workers time,” she added.

New recommendations

The new guidelines include 10 recommendations on how governments can use digital technology for maximum impact on their health systems.

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The new guidelines include 10 recommendations on how governments can use digital technology for maximum impact on their health systems. Pixabay

A WHO scientist specializing in digital innovations and research, Garrett Mehl, said the recommendations deal with issues such as birth notification.

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“Knowing that a baby has been born is critical to knowing how to provide vaccinations; knowing that the mother needs different post-natal care visits,” he said. “But without knowing that there was a birth that has happened, it is difficult to trigger those events in the health system.”

The guidelines also address privacy concerns.They have recommendations for ensuring that sensitive data, such as issues of sexual and reproductive health, are protected and not put at risk. (VOA)