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Soon your Smartphone can be charged by Swiping Fingers, says new Research

The “nanogenerator” was able to operate an LCD touch screen, 20 LED lights and a flexible keyboard with the device and without a battery

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Researchers at Michigan State University say they've developed a film that can turn swiping into energy for electronic devicess. (Mich. St.)- VOA News

Delhi, Dec 13, 2016: One day soon, your smartphone could be charged by swiping fingers, according to new research.

Writing in the journal Nano Energy, researchers from Michigan State University say they have developed a film-like device “to harvest energy from human motion.”

The researchers say the “nanogenerator” was able to operate an LCD touch screen, 20 LED lights and a flexible keyboard with the device and without a battery.

The film is made using a silicone wafer upon which thin layers of silver, polyimide and polypropylene ferroelectret are added. Ions are added and create energy when “the device is compressed by human motion.”

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“What I foresee, relatively soon, is the capability of not having to charge your cell phone for an entire week, for example, because that energy will be produced by your movement,”said Nelson Sepulveda, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering and lead investigator of the project..”

Furthermore, researchers say the device is “lightweight, flexible, biocompatible, scalable, low-cost and robust.”

Moreover, they add that the device becomes more powerful when it is folded.

“Each time you fold it you are increasing exponentially the amount of voltage you are creating,” Sepulveda said. “You can start with a large device, but when you fold it once, and again, and again, it is now much smaller and has more energy. Now it may be small enough to put in a specially made heel of your shoe so it creates power each time your heel strikes the ground.” (VOA)

 

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Usage of Smartphones for Eye Check-up May Lead to Misdiagnosis

However, when the images were calibrated, the differences between lighting levels and camera types were significantly minimalised - with differences between smartphones reduced by approximately 30 per cent

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Using smartphones to capture photographs of patients’ eyes for check-up may lead to misdiagnosis as camera colour sensors vary and as a result, images of the same eye may appear different depending on the model of smartphone used, warn researchers.

The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, suggests that calibration of phone cameras is vital to capture accurate data.

Eye examinations to look for redness in the eye can indicate a variety of conditions including conjunctivitis, dry-eye disease and tear-gland dysfunction.

Clinicians increasingly use smartphones in conjunction with ophthalmic imaging equipment, such as the eyepiece of a slit lamp, because of their portability, ease of use and relatively low cost.

The connectivity also allows for upload to the Cloud, which is useful for telemedicine – the remote diagnosis and treatment of patients using telecommunications technology – and Artificial Intelligence applications that store thousands of images from different institutions.

However, the autofocus algorithms and hardware specifications of cameras may be different for different manufacturers which means different cameras can produce different results for the same scene.

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“It is important that clinicians bear this in mind,” said lead study author Carles Otero from Anglia Ruskin University in England.

For the study, the researchers took 192 images of eyes using three smartphone cameras, two different lighting levels and two zoom levels.

The images were duplicated and one set was white balanced and colour corrected (calibrated) and the other left unaltered.

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The researchers took photographs in autofocus mode with the iPhone 6s, the Google Nexus 6p and the Bq Aquaris U Lite, and found that the iPhone results were significantly different from the other two devices, when computing relative redness of each eye, and when compared to a clinician’s diagnosis.

However, when the images were calibrated, the differences between lighting levels and camera types were significantly minimalised – with differences between smartphones reduced by approximately 30 per cent.

“Our results show that while the clinician’s subjective evaluation was not affected by different cameras, lighting conditions or optical magnifications, calibration of a smartphone’s camera is essential when extracting objective data from images,” Otero said. (IANS)