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There are more than Dosa and Idlis in South Indian cuisine: Chef Hari Nayak

Chefs like him and the others, he says, are trying to change the thought process of "what a Westerner thinks about Indian food".

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New Delhi, Dec 17: South Indian cuisine is “very underrated” and goes much beyond idlis and dosas, says New York-based Indian chef Hari Nayak, who he is also working hard to dispel misconceptions about Indian food in general in the West.

“South Indian (style of) cooking is very underrated. People think that South Indian dishes are just dosas and idlis. But I grew up eating fish and other non-vegetarian food items — apart from the vegetarian ones,” Nayak, who grew up in Udupi in Karnataka, told IANS during a brief visit to the national capital.

“I would like to build a concept around it and make it more exciting to people (of North India) so that they can try something which is also Indian food and is tasty and healthy. For instance, we use coconut milk instead of cream. It is lighter and healthier,” added the restaurateur.

There is the same misconception about Indian food in New York and other parts of the US and the UK as well.

“If we talk about Indian food, it’s all about Punjabi ‘khana’ in the West. If I open a South Indian restaurant serving just Kerala or Goan food, the Westerner would come and ask for naan, chicken tikka masala and dal makhani. That’s what they are exposed to.

South Indian dishes
South Indian food goes beyond Dosa and Idlis. Pixabay

“If I don’t serve that, they won’t come back. They would say, ‘This is not an Indian restaurant’. So, misconceptions are there.”

Chefs like him and the others, he says, are trying to change the thought process of “what a Westerner thinks about Indian food”.

“We are working hard to change the perception of Indian food — that is not greasy, not always curry-based. There is so much more to Indian food than that. Hopefully, in the next 10 years, Indian regional food items apart from Punjabi will be enjoyed by Westerners as well,” said Nayak, who shares a strong bond with popular chef Vikas Khanna.

Would he blame Indian chefs for emphasising more on North Indian cuisine in the West?

“In the early 1960s, when Indian cuisine started getting popular in the West, chefs focused only on that (North Indian food). Nobody tried to do something different. Since the last 30-40 years, chefs have been serving the same things, so people have preconceived notions about Indian food.

“I think Indian chefs are to be blamed — but that’s what was selling. After all, it’s business. Even now, if you go to a Kerala restaurant, you will still find naan, rotis, chana masala and tandoori chicken on the menu because they don’t want people to walk out.

“There are Chettinad restaurants in New York but the last two pages of the menu are dedicated to North Indian food. It’s unfortunate,” said Nayak, who moved to the US over two decades ago.

How does he plan to bring about change?

“It won’t happen overnight. I do a lot of pop-up events. I use scallops, an ingredient which is familiar to the Western palate, and I make Indian food with that. I never use North Indian flavours much. That’s how I create awareness,” he said.

Nayak was here for the launch of The Trial, which is a blend of chefs, entrepreneurs, and innovative food concepts. It is a delivery cum dine-in kitchen concept on Golf Course Road, Gurugram.

“We are at a nascent stage. If somebody comes in with a concept that’s interesting to me, then I will help,” he said.

“The chef can interact with about 15 customers at a time at The Trial, which is counter style. Serving just 15 people is not enough to sustain a business. So, there is a delivery model too,” said Nayak, who plans to launch his own restaurant in Bengaluru soon.

Before that, he will unveil his book — “Spice Trail” — which has “100 modern global recipes to excite and inspire home cooks”.

“I have written five books for the Western market, but my new book is for the Indian market. It will release at the beginning of 2018,” he said.

“It will teach home cooks to prepare food by adding new ingredients to their pantry… ingredients that are available in supermarkets. Using them while cooking will make their everyday food more exciting,” he added. IANS

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Know What India Loves To Eat! Idli Makes It As The Most Ordered Food

Globally, San Francisco, London and New Jersey have been found to be the top idli ordering cities.

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idli
Uber Eats will run special idli offers and combos across idli loving cities on World Idli Day, Reddy said. Pixabay

Idli is the most ordered food item in Bengaluru, followed by Mumbai and Chennai, finds a study by food delivery app Uber Eats.

Idli is often eaten for breakfast along with piping hot sambhar and a variety of chutneys.

idli
For the last three years, March 30 has been celebrated as World Idli Day. It is said to be the brainchild of Eniyavan, a popular idli-only caterer from Chennai. 
Pixabay

“Idli has been a top breakfast item that consumers love… It appeals to people of varied food preferences and is a popular comfort food for many,” Deepak Reddy, Head of Central Operations, Uber Eats India, said in a statement on Thursday.

Data from restaurants across 38 cities that specialise in idli and are known for unique variations of the dish show that Bengaluru consumes idli the most, followed by Mumbai, Chennai, Pune and Hyderabad.

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Idli is often eaten for breakfast along with piping hot sambhar and a variety of chutneys. Pixabay

Globally, San Francisco, London and New Jersey have been found to be the top idli ordering cities.

Also Read: Singapore To Come Up With Strict Alcohol Norms For Pilots

For the last three years, March 30 has been celebrated as World Idli Day. It is said to be the brainchild of Eniyavan, a popular idli-only caterer from Chennai.

Uber Eats will run special idli offers and combos across idli loving cities on World Idli Day, Reddy said. (IANS)

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Indulge in Gluttony: 14 Surprising Facts that you never knew about Indian Food!

Facts about the origin and evolution of Indian food

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Indian Food, Wikimedia

October 16, 2016: Indian food is one of the most popular and loved forms of food across the globe. Be it the tangy, spicy curries and the heavenly sweet dishes, literally everyone loves the Indian cuisine. Here are some interesting facts on the original and evolution of Indian food.

  • India is known as The Land of Spices. No other country on the map produces as many types of spices as India does.
  • Indian cuisine in deeply influenced by the Greek, Roman and Arab.
  • The heavenly saffron was brought to India by Persian rulers around 500 BC.
  • The basic ingredients of Indian cuisine like tomato, chilli and potato are not even Indian and have a Portuguese origin.
  • It was also the Portuguese who gave us refined sugar. Before that, India depended on honey and fruits as sweeteners.
Indian Spices, Wikimedia
Indian Spices, Wikimedia
  • The very mouth-watering chicken tikka, that we are so proud of, is actually not ours. It was first cooked in Glasgow, Scotland.
  • There are currently more than 80,000 Indian restaurants in the US. The first one was opened in the 1960s.
  • The food and eating methods of the early Indian civilisation are still a secret, as their ancient language has not been understood yet.
  • Chutney is one of the best food inventions of India. The British loved it too and they named one of our chutneys as ‘Major Grey’s’. It is sold across India even today.
  • Payasam in a popular south Indian sweet dish. A south Indian wedding is incomplete until this dish is served!
  • Wazwan is a traditional Kashmiri dish in which the spices are boiled instead of being fried. This technique gives the dish a Central Asian touch.
  • Pepper is rightly called the king of spices as it tastes well with almost anything!
  • The ‘dum’ style of cooking has an interesting origin. The kingdom of Awadh was facing food shortage. To cook a large amount of food using minimal supplies, meals were cooked in big handis, sealed with dough. This is how dum pulao and dum biryani were invented.
  • Indian food is divided into 3 categories- Saatvic ( vegetables, fruits and juices), Raajsic (Oily,spicy food) and Taamsic ( Meat, liquor and also garlic and onion). Saatvic food is considered good for the body and mind as it leads to higher stages of consciousness. Raajsic food is related to activity. Taamsic food is considered bad for the mind as it has a negative influence.

–  by Pragya Arora of NewsGram. Twitter: @Wanderlust6400

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Idli is not an authentic South Indian Cuisine, might have migrated from Indonesia!

The Sanskrit Manasollasa of 1130 AD has ‘iddarika’, but it is representative of being made from urad dhal flour only

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Idli. Image source: scdn.archanaskitchen.com
  • In Tamil Maccapuranam, the ‘ itali’ made only a late appearance, in 17th century AD.
  • History credits that Arab traders often used to visit the southern coast for trade, even before the advent of Islam in the country
  • The Sanskrit Manasollasa of 1130 AD has ‘iddarika’, but it is again representative of being made from urad dhal flour only

In a shattering revelation to everyone who has believed Idli to be an authentic South Indian cuisine, the truth could be that the soft, fluffy rounds of rice might have migrated to India from Indonesia or have been brought along by Arab settlers.

According to K.T. Acharya’s (a prominent food historian) theory, idli’s are a relatively new introduction to Indian cuisine, quoted The Hindu.

He points out that the word idli might have been derived from ‘iddalige’, as mentioned in a 920 AD Kannada work, but the suggestions are that this was made from an urad dhal batter only, which was neither steamed for fluffiness, nor fermented.

The Sanskrit Manasollasa of 1130 AD has ‘iddarika’, but it is again representative of being made from urad dhal flour only.  A century later, in Karnataka, idli is described as being ‘light, like coins of high value.’

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In Tamil Maccapuranam, the ‘ itali’ made only a late appearance, in 17th century AD.

All these references point to these three facts:

  • Rice wasn’t used with urad dhal
  • There was no fermentation of the mixture initially
  • The batter wasn’t steamed for fluffiness

According to The Hindu, Acharya claims that it was only after 1250 AD that idli was made the way it is prepared today. He further points out that this absence of the present way of preparing idli could then possibly mean that idli is a migrated food item and most probably from Indonesia.

variety of idlis on display at Planet Fun in Vijayawada.Image source: www.thehindu.com
Variety of idlis on display at Planet Fun in Vijayawada.Image source: www.thehindu.com

The food is known to be an Indonesian dish because various Hindu kings from the country would often travel to India in search of a suitable bride. They often brought their cooks along, who in turn brought with them a technique that changed the nature of this breakfast delight forever.

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Indonesia also has a long tradition of fermented products, like tempeh (fermented soy cakes), kecap (the recipe we get ketchup from) or something called kedli, which Acharya explains, is like an idli.

However, other references available at the Al-Azhar University Library in Cairo suggest that Arab traders in the southern belt brought in the idli after they married and settled down in those parts.

History credits that Arab traders often used to visit the southern coast for trade, even before the advent of Islam in the country. The first mosque outside the Arab peninsula was built by Arab settlers who initially came as traders.

The Arab settlers were very particular about their diets. A majority of them migrated here when Mohammed was still alive when they were relatively new to Islam from Paganism.

They insisted on halaal food, and Indian food was quite strange to their taste. To avoid all such dilemma about what is halaal or haraam in food, they started making rice balls. Post making the rice balls, they would slightly flatten them and compliment it with bland coconut paste.

Later, it was improved upon, and from the 8th century onwards, the idli in its contemporary avatar came into being.

-prepared by Bulbul Sharma, a staff-writer at NewsGram. Twitter handle: iBulbul_

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One response to “Idli is not an authentic South Indian Cuisine, might have migrated from Indonesia!”

  1. There are so many cuisines that we think are Indian born but they are not. For example, samosa came from middle east and Indians added their spices and techniques to it. Above article is a great article . Great Information.

There are more than Dosa and Idlis in South Indian cuisine: Chef Hari Nayak
Know What India Loves To Eat! Idli Makes It As The Most Ordered Food
Indulge in Gluttony: 14 Surprising Facts that you never knew about Indian Food!
Idli is not an authentic South Indian Cuisine, might have migrated from Indonesia!