Wednesday October 23, 2019
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SpaceX Successfully Launches Dragon Spacecraft for Resupply Mission to ISS

The Dragon spacecraft is scheduled to reach the ISS on May 6, NASA said

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In this photo provided by NASA, the SpaceX Crew Dragon is pictured about 20 meters (66 feet) away from the International Space Station’s Harmony module, March 3, 2019. It left Friday to splash down in the Atlantic. VOA

After several attempts earlier, SpaceX on Saturday successfully launched a Dragon spacecraft for its 17th resupply mission to the International Space Station (ISS).

“@SpaceX’s #Dragon spacecraft launched at 2:48am ET on a mission to deliver more than 5,500 pounds of research, crew supplies and hardware to the @Space_Station,” NASA said in a tweet.

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The Dragon spacecraft is scheduled to reach the ISS on May 6, NASA said. Pixabay

Loaded with about 2,500 kg of research, supplies and hardware for crew members living and working on the orbiting laboratory, the spacecraft launched aboard a Falcon 9 rocket from the Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

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The Dragon spacecraft is scheduled to reach the ISS on May 6, NASA said.

The spacecraft will remain at the space station for about four weeks before returning to Earth with more than 1,900 kg of research and return cargo. (IANS)

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Starship Could Fly People Next Year, Says SpaceX CEO Elon Musk

“In the meantime, Commercial Crew is years behind schedule. NASA expects to see the same level of enthusiasm focused on the investments of the taxpayer. It’s time to deliver.”

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SpaceX founder and chief executive Elon Musk, left, announces Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa (R) as the first private passenger on a trip around the moon. VOA

Unveiling his plans for the Starship rocket, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has said that the reusable launch system designed to take humans to the Moon, Mars and beyond could fly with crew next year.

“I think we could potentially see people fly next year, if we get to orbit in about six months,” Musk said during a presentation on the company’s progress towards making interplanetary travel a reality on Saturday which marked the 11th anniversary of SpaceX reaching orbit for the first time.

The ever-optimistic tech billionaire, however, added that much would depend on the continued improvements in building the rockets.

Building reusable rockets is fundamental to making space travel a reality, he said at the event held at SpaceX’s South Texas test site.

“It’s the holy grail of space travel,” he said, while standing beneath Starship Mk1, a prototype for the SpaceX launch system.

“To date, we’ve completed 78 launches and have developed the world’s only operational reusable orbital class rockets and spacecraft – capable of launching to space, returning to Earth, and flying again,” SpaceX said.

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AI could be first ‘resident’ of Mars, hints Musk. (Wikimedia Commons)

The company said that Starship will ultimately carry as many as 100 people on long-duration, interplanetary flights.

SpaceX is building Starship with a mission to provide affordable delivery of significant quantities of cargo and people, essential for building Moon bases and Mars cities.

“Starship serves as a large, long-duration spacecraft capable of carrying passengers or cargo to Earth orbit, planetary destinations, and between destinations on Earth,” SpaceX said.

However, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine on Friday reminded SpaceX that it was time to deliver the Crew Dragon spacecraft designed to fly crew to and from the International Space Station.

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“I am looking forward to the SpaceX announcement tomorrow,” Bridenstine wrote on Twitter on Friday.

“In the meantime, Commercial Crew is years behind schedule. NASA expects to see the same level of enthusiasm focused on the investments of the taxpayer. It’s time to deliver.” (IANS)