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Accident, Speed Trap Reporting Feature on Google Maps

Notably, the company hasn't officially announced the introduction of this feature yet and it is not known when exactly it would be rolled out for all

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Google Maps is rolling out reporting features for speed traps and accidents, almost a year after it introduced speed limits in navigation.

“If a new icon appeared in the Maps for you recently, don’t worry, it’s not another messaging service from Google.Rather, it’s a shortcut for opening up the new reporting feature for speed traps and accidents.

“Similar to Waze, Google Maps is adding the ability for users to take part in reporting accidents they see along their route, and speed traps,” 9to5Google reported late on Wednesday.

google maps
Google Maps is adding the ability for users to take part in reporting accidents they see along their route, and speed traps. Pixabay

Notably, the company hasn’t officially announced the introduction of this feature yet and it is not known when exactly it would be rolled out for all.

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“Over the winter, the company further refined that interface, and now it’s pretty close to what we’re seeing today. Over the past week, it seems that Google has expanded the availability of this feature by quite a bit,” the report added. (IANS)

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Google Maps Over 4.5 Million Animals in the Wild

With this data, managers of protected areas or anti-poaching programs can gauge the health of specific species, and local governments can use data to inform policies and create conservation measures

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Google maps
Google Integrates Brazil's Indigenous Territories into its Maps. Wikimedia Coomons

In an initiative for better wildlife protection, seven organizations, led by Conservation International and Google has mapped more than 4.5 million animals in the wild using photos taken from motion-activated cameras known as camera traps.

The photos are all part of Wildlife Insights, an AI-enabled, Google Cloud-based platform that streamlines conservation monitoring by speeding up camera trap photo analysis.

“With photos and aggregated data available for the world to see, people can change the way protected areas are managed, empower local communities in conservation and bring the best data closer to conservationists and decision makers,” the company said in a statement on Tuesday.

With Wildlife Insights, conservation scientists with camera trap photos can now upload their images to Google Cloud and run Google’s species identification AI models over the images, collaborate with others, visualize wildlife on a map and develop insights on species population health.

Google Maps
Google Maps have captured more than 10 million miles of Street View imagery – a distance that could circle the globe over 400 times. Pixabay

It is the largest and most diverse public camera-trap database in the world that allows people to explore millions of camera-trap images, and filter images by species, country and year.

On average, human experts can label 300 to 1,000 images per hour. With the help of Google AI Platform Predictions, Wildlife Insights can classify the same images up to 3,000 times faster, analyzing 3.6 million photos an hour. To make this possible, we trained an AI model to automatically classify species in an image using Google’s open source TensorFlow framework.

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Even though species identification can be a challenging task for AI, across the 614 species that Google’s AI models have been trained on, species like jaguars, white-lipped peccaries and African elephants have between an 80 to 98.6 percent probability of being correctly predicted.

With this data, managers of protected areas or anti-poaching programs can gauge the health of specific species, and local governments can use data to inform policies and create conservation measures. (IANS)