Thursday January 30, 2020

Spend More Time Standing and Combat Negative Health Effects of Sedentary Lifestyle

If we take steps to combat a sedentary lifestyle by making small lifestyle changes, such as spending more time standing, this could reduce the risk

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Time, Health, Sedentary Lifestyle
The research published in the journal PLOS ONE, has also found that we burn 45 kilocalories more, per six-hour period while standing compared to lying or sitting. Pixabay

Spend more time standing to increase energy expenditure and combat the negative health effects of a sedentary lifestyle, a new study suggests.

The research published in the journal PLOS ONE, has also found that we burn 45 kilocalories more, per six-hour period while standing compared to lying or sitting.

“If we take steps to combat a sedentary lifestyle by making small lifestyle changes, such as spending more time standing, this could reduce the risk of developing diseases such as obesity or Type 2 diabetes,” said study lead author Francisco J. Amaro-Gahete from the University of Granada in Spain.

For the study, the researchers used a sample comprising 53 young adults, who were classified into two types, “savers” and “spenders” of energy, depending on the amount of energy expenditure they consumed when switching from sitting or lying to standing.

Time, Health, Sedentary Lifestyle
Spend more time standing to increase energy expenditure and combat the negative health effects of a sedentary lifestyle, a new study suggests. Pixabay

“Savers consume very little energy in their activities and, therefore, the difference between sitting/lying or standing is practically nil for them. But energy spenders burn approximately 10 per cent more energy when they switch from sitting or lying to standing,” Amaro said.

The factor that appears to have the greatest effect is muscle mass.

People with more muscle mass expend more energy than people with less muscle mass, said the researcher.

In light of the results, the authors recommend spending more time standing in the office as a good strategy to use up more energy and thus avoid storing it as fat.

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“If a person were to get up, take 10 steps, and sit down again, it appears that the effects of a sedentary lifestyle would be greatly reduced,” said study researcher Jonatan Ruiz. (IANS)

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Bariatric Surgery may Help Resolve Respiratory Issues

Weight loss surgery may improve breathing issues

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Respiratory
Researchers have revealed that Bariatric surgery and weight loss appear to reverse some of the negative effects of obesity on the respiratory system. Pixabay

Researchers have revealed that Bariatric surgery and weight loss appear to reverse some of the negative effects of obesity on the respiratory system.

Known effects of obesity on the respiratory system include increased respiratory work, along with compromised airway resistance and respiratory muscle strength, which may all contribute to restrictive pulmonary function impairment.

As an imaging technology that provides detailed pictures of the lungs and airways, CT has great potential to improve understanding of obesity’s impact on the respiratory system.

Until now, however, there have been few CT studies evaluating obesity’s effects on the lungs and the trachea, often referred to as the windpipe.

“For the first time, this study has demonstrated changes in the CT morphology of large and small airways that improve when individuals lose weight. These features correlate with an improvement in patient symptoms,” said study lead author Susan J. Copley from Hammersmith Hospital in London.

Respiratory  weight loss
Known effects of obesity on the respiratory system include increased respiratory work. Pixabay

For the study, published in the journal Radiology, the research team evaluated changes in the respiratory systems of 51 obese individuals who underwent Bariatric surgery, a treatment for obese patients who haven’t responded to other weight loss approaches.

The procedure reduces the size of the stomach. All participants lost weight post-surgery with a mean body mass index decrease of 10.5 kg/m2.

The researchers used CT to measure the size and shape of the trachea and assessed air trapping, a phenomenon in which excess air remains in the lungs after exhaling, resulting in a reduction in lung function.

Air trapping is an indirect sign of obstruction in the small airways of the lung.

When the researchers compared results at baseline and six months after Bariatric surgery, they found that surgery and weight loss were associated with morphological, or structural, changes to the lung and trachea.

Also Read- Drinking Alcohol During Pregnancy Proved to be Harmful: Study

The results suggest that there may be a reversible element of small airway inflammation related to obesity and that reversal of this inflammation correlates with improvement in symptoms. The findings also point to CT as a potential marker of this inflammation.

“CT is a useful morphological marker to demonstrate subtle changes which are not easily assessed by lung function alone,” Copley said. (IANS)