Monday December 16, 2019

Spend More Time Standing and Combat Negative Health Effects of Sedentary Lifestyle

If we take steps to combat a sedentary lifestyle by making small lifestyle changes, such as spending more time standing, this could reduce the risk

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Time, Health, Sedentary Lifestyle
The research published in the journal PLOS ONE, has also found that we burn 45 kilocalories more, per six-hour period while standing compared to lying or sitting. Pixabay

Spend more time standing to increase energy expenditure and combat the negative health effects of a sedentary lifestyle, a new study suggests.

The research published in the journal PLOS ONE, has also found that we burn 45 kilocalories more, per six-hour period while standing compared to lying or sitting.

“If we take steps to combat a sedentary lifestyle by making small lifestyle changes, such as spending more time standing, this could reduce the risk of developing diseases such as obesity or Type 2 diabetes,” said study lead author Francisco J. Amaro-Gahete from the University of Granada in Spain.

For the study, the researchers used a sample comprising 53 young adults, who were classified into two types, “savers” and “spenders” of energy, depending on the amount of energy expenditure they consumed when switching from sitting or lying to standing.

Time, Health, Sedentary Lifestyle
Spend more time standing to increase energy expenditure and combat the negative health effects of a sedentary lifestyle, a new study suggests. Pixabay

“Savers consume very little energy in their activities and, therefore, the difference between sitting/lying or standing is practically nil for them. But energy spenders burn approximately 10 per cent more energy when they switch from sitting or lying to standing,” Amaro said.

The factor that appears to have the greatest effect is muscle mass.

People with more muscle mass expend more energy than people with less muscle mass, said the researcher.

In light of the results, the authors recommend spending more time standing in the office as a good strategy to use up more energy and thus avoid storing it as fat.

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“If a person were to get up, take 10 steps, and sit down again, it appears that the effects of a sedentary lifestyle would be greatly reduced,” said study researcher Jonatan Ruiz. (IANS)

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Kids in LMICs Receive Excessive Amount of Antibiotic Prescriptions

Kids in low income countries prescribed excess antibiotics

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Antibiotic Prescriptions
Children who receive excessive antibiotic prescriptions may lose the ability to fight pathogens. Pixabay

Kids in low and middle-income countries (LMICs) are receiving an excessive amount of antibiotic prescriptions that could harm the children’s ability to fight pathogens as well as increase antibiotic resistance worldwide, warns a new study.

Children in these countries received 25 antibiotic prescriptions through age five – a “remarkable” estimate, given that two antibiotic prescriptions per year is considered excessive in many high-income settings, said the study published in the journal The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

“We knew children in LMICs are sick more often, and we knew antibiotic prescription rates are high in many countries. What we did not know was how these elements translate into actual antibiotic exposure – and the results are rather alarming,” said lead author of the study Gunther Fink from Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH), Basel, Switzerland.

Antimicrobial resistance is one of today’s biggest threats to global health and development, according to the World Health Organization.

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Children in LMICs received 25 antibiotic prescriptions through age. Pixabay

One factor contributing to this global health threat is the excessive use of antibiotics worldwide.

The research team from Swiss TPH and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in the US analysed data from 2007-2017 from health facilities and household surveys from eight countries: Haiti, Kenya, Malawi, Namibia, Nepal, Senegal, Tanzania, and Uganda.

Results showed that antibiotics were administered in 81 per cent of cases for children with a respiratory illness, in 50 per cent for children with diarrhoea, and in 28 per cent for children with malaria.

The researchers found that the number of antibiotic prescriptions in early childhood varied from country to country.

While a child in Senegal received approximately one antibiotic prescription per year in the first five years of life, a child in Uganda was prescribed up to 12.

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In comparison, a prior study showed that children under five in Europe receive less than one antibiotic prescription per year on average.

“This number is still high given that the vast majority of infections in this age group are of viral origin,” said study co-author Valerie D’Acremont from Swiss TPH. (IANS)