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Spiritual significance of colors in Hinduism: Read Here!

The Hindu population identifies colors with philosophy and tradition and is often used as a tool for worship

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.Representational Image. Image source: pinterest.com
  • Transcending the decorative values and emotional association, Hinduism which is so in tune with nature, gives a spiritual meaning to almost every color
  • The Hindu population identifies colors with philosophy and tradition and is often used as a tool for worship
  • Red symbolizes passion, power, strength and purity and is of utmost significance in the Hindu religion

The way we view and perceive the wonderful world around us is because of the life is given to it by colors. Colors not only define what we see but have also been proven to induce emotions and generate thoughts that can drastically change our state of being. We often associate colors to feelings like how anger and passion can be associated with warm colors like red and orange, and sadness and calmness are linked to colors like blue and green.

Colors when used to depict natural elements like the sun, the earth, and the sky, become the symbolic representation of that element possessing all of its characteristics and functions. Transcending the decorative values and emotional association, Hinduism which is so in tune with nature, gives a spiritual meaning to almost every color. The Hindu population identifies colors with philosophy and tradition and is often used as a tool for worship. Saints dress themselves in saffron to symbolize purity and blue is associated with the Hindu deity Krishna.

Here are some of the colors and their significance-

Red

Red symbolizes passion, power, strength and purity and is of utmost significance in the Hindu religion. In the wedding ceremonies, brides wear red clothing, put red dye in their hair and place a red dot on their foreheads as it signifies purity. It also depicts fertility as the clay earth is red and produces many harvests. Red is also the color of shakti. Deities depicted in red are those who are charitable, brave, and protective. According to the traditions, on the death of a woman, her body is wrapped in a red cloth for the cremation.

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 Saffron
Saffron which is composed of shades of golden-yellow and orange represents the fire which burns the impurities and cleanses itself in the process. Holy men and ascetics who have renounced the world dress in saffron as it represents purity and religious abstinence.The color saffron is also representative of lightness and wisdom, qualities that the saints possess.

Image Source: 123rf.com
Image Source: 123rf.com

Green

Green represents the natural world that the deities created and symbolizes purity, peace, and happiness. It also is  symbolic of the happiness, peace, and harmony that the deities bring to Hindus. Fertility, life, and rebirth that are found in nature are also represented by the color green.

White

Purity, cleanliness, peace, and knowledge are what the color white represents. Saraswati, the goddess of knowledge,  is always shown as wearing a white dress, sitting on a white lotus. White is also symbolic of death in Hinduism. A Hindu widow wears a white dress in mourning as it represents their need to reflect back to the world and detach themselves from society while grieving.

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Blue

The sky, the oceans, the rivers and lakes that make up most of what we see are blue. It is symbolic of the peacefulness of nature. Many Hindu gods, such as Vishnu, Krishna, and Shiva, are depicted as having blue skin as it represents calmness and intuition. A deity like Lord Rama and Krishna who has the qualities of bravery, manliness, determination, the ability to deal with difficult situations, of stable mind and depth of character are colored blue.

Yellow

Often depicted in the clothes of wise Hindu deities, such as Vishnu, Krishna, and Ganesha, the color yellow symbolizes stability and knowledge, and spring.As the color of the sun, yellow also represents the characteristics of the sun, such as light, warmth, and happiness. It is also the color of spring which activates the mind.

– prepared by Ajay Krishna of NewsGram. Twitter: @ajkrish14

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  • AJ Krish

    Hinduism associates every colour to spirituality. Such associations make it easy for people to remember the ideals always.

Next Story

Does India’s Giant Step in the Direction of Green Energy Signal an End to Coal?

Coal consumption forecasts have already been downgraded significantly from 2013 projections, and major shifts in energy policy like Modi’s are likely to add significant weight to the idea that India might well become a much bigger player in renewable energy production in the next 20 to 30 years

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FILE - Smoke billows from chimneys of the cooling towers of a coal-fired power plant in Dadong, Shanxi province, China. VOA

When Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government announced its target to increase India’s renewable energy capacity to an equivalent of 40% of the nation’s total green energy output, it raised eyebrows. Could this mean an end to India’s coking coal industry?

Is there investment for green energy?

For any alternative to coal to be a serious consideration, there must be investment sources. Already India’s renewable target has attracted investors like Japan’s SoftBank, which agreed to a deal to sell power generated from a Northern Indian solar bank at 2.4 rupees per unit – below that of coal power, which currently costs over 3 rupees per unit.

Contrary to the enormous investment in the production of solar panels being manufactured by China, which has made them cheap enough to encourage this Indian growth in solar renewable energy, there has been relatively little investment in Indian coal.

Asia-Pacific
Workers operate machines at a coal mine at Palaran district in Samarinda, Indonesia (VOA)

For instance, state-run NTPC has cancelled several large coal mining projects, including a huge plant in Andhra Pradesh. Meanwhile, the private sector has continued investing in renewables. Adani Power has over $600 million invested in solar panels in the southern state of Tamil Nadu.

That Modi has made an investment of $42 billion in the renewable energy sector over the past four years and his renewables plan is likely to generate a further $80 billion in the green energy sector in the next four years is good news for the Rupee. External investment in India is likely a sign of increased currency transaction in forex trading signalling the Rupee gaining strength against other pairs. Like the Indian economy, millions of dollars are traded on currencies every day, and increased interest in the Rupee helps cement India’s economic and investment potential.

How reliant is India on coal power?

Not so long ago the Indian government had a target to connect 40 million households to the national grid by the end of 2018. It even tasked CIL, the state coal monopoly, to produce over a billion tonnes of coal per year by 2020, an increase of almost 100% from 2016. It’s an ambitious goal, notwithstanding the environmental impacts of mining for such an unprecedented amount of coal. This is the same coal that already generates 70% of India’s primary commercial energy requirement; compare that figure to the UK’s 11%, Germany’s 38%, and China’s 68%, while France has practically shut all of its coal power stations. This means that India’s shift from coal could have important implications for the global climate, and any investors looking towards coal would be making a very brave and risky decision.

Coal
Environmentally, coal isn’t a sustainable source of power, certainly not in current quotas.

The increasing problem with relying on coal

Environmentally, coal isn’t a sustainable source of power, certainly not in current quotas. Clean-up costs could make coal an out-of-date power source sooner rather than later. A report by Oxford University estimated that investors in coal power may lose upwards of half a trillion dollars because assets cannot be profitably run or retired early due to global temperature rises and agreed carbon emission reductions.

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Coal consumption forecasts have already been downgraded significantly from 2013 projections, and major shifts in energy policy like Modi’s are likely to add significant weight to the idea that India might well become a much bigger player in renewable energy production in the next 20 to 30 years – although it’s difficult not to see coal remaining an important power source considering India’s significantly large coal reserves still available in Eastern India.