Tuesday January 21, 2020
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Sri Lanka May Soon Introduce a GPS Tracking System to Foil Human, Drug Smuggling Via Sea

Sri Lanka to introduce GPS system to foil human, drug smuggling via sea

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Image source: youtube.com

The Sri Lankan Fisheries Ministry will soon introduce a GPS tracking system and a special identity card for all fishermen across the island country to prevent human and drug smuggling via the sea, a government official has said.

Fisheries Director General Prasanna Geeganage said on Monday that drug trafficking, smuggling of illegal migrants and other illegal activities were being carried out under the guise of fishing and steps would soon be taken to tackle this issue, Xinhua news agency reported.

Following the introduction of the GPS tracking system and the identity card, all fishermen who set out to sea will be required to prove their identity by scanning their fingerprints.

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The new steps were being taken following repeated requests by Sri Lankan fishermen. Pixabay

The new steps were being taken following repeated requests by Sri Lankan fishermen, Geeganage said.

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The Sri Lankan government recently said the island country had become a transit point for major drug cartels as a consequence of the prolonged illicit activities of the Tamil Tiger rebels who were defeated by government troops in 2009 following a 30-year civil conflict. (IANS)

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Living in Coastal Areas Can Support Better Mental Health: Study

Access to the coast could help to reduce these health inequalities in towns and cities close to the sea

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Coastal Areas
People in poorer households living close to Coastal Areas experience fewer symptoms of mental health disorders. Pixabay

Living in the Coastal Areas could support better mental health in England’s poorest urban communities, a new study suggests.

The study, published in the journal Health & Place revealed that living in large towns and cities near to England’s coastline is linked with better mental health for those in the lowest earning households.

“Our research suggests, for the first time, that people in poorer households living close to the coast experience fewer symptoms of mental health disorders,” said study lead author Jo Garrett from University of Exeter in the UK

“When it comes to mental health, this ‘protective’ zone could play a useful role in helping to level the playing field between those on high and low income,” she said.

Researchers used survey data from nearly 26,000 respondents in their analysis, which marks one of the most detailed investigations ever into the wellbeing effects of being beside the sea.

The research used data from the Health Survey for England and compared people’s health to their proximity to the coast; from those living less than one km away, to those more than 50 km away.

Coastal Areas
Living in the Coastal Areas could support better mental health in England’s poorest urban communities, a new study suggests. Pixabay

Its findings add to the growing evidence that access to blue spaces – particularly coastal environments – might improve health and wellbeing.

Approximately one in six adults in England suffer from mental health disorders such as anxiety and depression, and these are far more likely in people from poorer backgrounds.

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The findings suggest that access to the coast could help to reduce these health inequalities in towns and cities close to the sea. (IANS)