Saturday December 14, 2019
Home Lead Story Sri Lanka Rev...

Sri Lanka Revokes Ban on Social Media

However, he warned that “who ever shares misinformation has to take responsibility for whatever they share”

0
//
gas
Image source: youtube.com

Sri Lankan President Maithripala Sirisena on Tuesday revoked the government’s ban on social media use that was imposed throughout the island nation after the April 21 Easter Sunday bombings that killed 253 people.

A statement from the government’s information department said that Sirisena had ordered to lift the temporary ban, which had been applied in the immediate aftermath of the attacks, reports Efe news.

In the brief statement, the head of the department, Nalaka Kaluwewa, said the government was appealing social media users to “be responsible in their usage of social media sites even though the ban has been lifted”.

“The decision to ban social media was taken immediately after the attacks. Now after analysing (the situation), the government is of the view that it can be lifted,” Kaluwewa told Efe.

face veils
Security officers patrol outside a luxury hotel, days after a string of suicide bomb attacks across the island on Easter Sunday, in Colombo, Sri Lanka, April 27, 2019. VOA

“Further, we have to look at returning to normalcy and this decision (to revoke the ban) was connected to that as well.”

However, he warned that “who ever shares misinformation has to take responsibility for whatever they share”.

Also Read- Tech Giant Apple Loses its 5G Modem Project Lead

“Under the emergency regulations which are in force, the spreading of misinformation can be addressed and action can be taken against those who share such matter,” Kaluwewa added.

Immediately after the bombings, authorities declared a state of emergency on the island and blocked social media services and messaging apps such as Facebook, WhatsApp, Viber and Snapchat, arguing that such platforms were being used to spread misinformation and rumors across cyberspace to trigger violence. (IANS)

Next Story

Governments Around The World are Learning to Confuse Dissidents on Social Media

The researchers, who published their findings in a recent issue of Political Science Research and Methods, specifically examined social media from both the Venezuela regime and its opposition

0
Social Media
The regime also seemed to develop a more sophisticated approach to using hashtags on Social Media. The regime used long hashtags, as opposed to the shorter hashtags that are more commonly used, to promote distraction among the protest groups. Pixabay

Governments the world over are learning new tactics to quash dissent on various Social Media platforms, responding with tweets designed to distract and confuse like longer hashtags, according to a team of political scientists.

In a study of Twitter interactions during Venezuela’s 2014 protests, in which citizens voiced opposition to government leaders and called for improvements to their standard of living, the tweets of the protesters focused mainly on the protest itself, while the tweets issued by the ruling regime covered more diverse topics.

This could mean that regimes are growing more savvy in their use of social media to help suppress mass movements.

“When we started doing this study there had been a lot of optimism about the capacity of social media to produce revolutions throughout the world, like Arab Spring and the Color Revolutions in Europe,” said Kevin Munger, assistant professor of political science and social data analytics, Penn State.

“But it seems like, in hindsight, this was the result of short-term disequilibrium between the capacity of the masses to use this technology and the limited capacity of these elites to use it.”

A lot of these elites may have not been keeping up with modern communication technology and got caught unawares.

So, for that short period of time, social media did produce better outcomes for revolutions and mass movements.

The researchers, who published their findings in a recent issue of Political Science Research and Methods, specifically examined social media from both the Venezuela regime and its opposition.

Social Media
Governments the world over are learning new tactics to quash dissent on various Social Media platforms, responding with tweets designed to distract and confuse like longer hashtags, according to a team of political scientists. Pixabay

Following the death of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez in early 2013, Nicolas Maduro, Chavez’s vice-president, won a special election.

After his election, mass protests erupted related to economic decline and increased crime.

In their analysis, the researchers noted that the regime abruptly shifted its Twitter strategy after protests swept across the country.

The topics of the regime’s tweets became even more diverse than usual — including such topics as a tree-planting event — and often did not address the protests at all.

As the protests continued, however, the researchers said that the opposition also became less focused, which the researchers suggest may have been a reaction to the regime’s social media strategy.

The way that attention works on social networks offers a glimpse into why the strategy to distract citizens might be effective, added Munger, who worked on the study while a doctoral student in politics at New York University.

Social Media
Regimes are growing more savvy in their use of Social Media to help suppress mass movements. Pixabay

“To have effective protests, you need to have a ton of people coordinated on a single message, so spreading other narratives disrupts that process of coordination,” said Munger.

“Being able to spread doubt is effective. You don’t have to get people to love your regime, you just need people to less convinced of the single narrative.”

ALSO READ: President of Egypt Calls for Collective Action Against Countries Supporting Terrorism

The regime also seemed to develop a more sophisticated approach to using hashtags. The regime used long hashtags, as opposed to the shorter hashtags that are more commonly used, to promote distraction among the protest groups. (IANS)