Friday May 25, 2018
Home India Indian Origin...

Indian Origin Srinivas Gokulnath, Amit Samarth Create History By Completing World’s Toughest Cycle Race Across America

More than twelve Indian riders qualified for RAAM in the past decade through special rides that take place in different regions like the Deccan plateau, the Thar desert and the hills of southern India

0
//
139
Gokulnath is the first indian to cross Race Across America
Mountain Biking. Pixabay
Republish
Reprint
  • Srinivas Gokulnath marked history by becoming the first Indian to complete the toughest cycle race in the world – RAAM
  • Dr Amit Samarth  trailed behind him at the finish line
  • Gokulnath stood 7th amongst the nine men who finished whereas Samarth stood 8th

June 27, 2017: Srinivas Gokulnath marked history by becoming the first Indian to complete what is known to be the toughest cycle race in the world. He completed 4900 km Race Across America (RAAM) in solo category in the stretch of Eleven days, 18 hours and 45 minutes after setting out from California.

Dr Amit Samarth of Nagpur, trailed behind him at the finish line at Annapolis on American east coast around midnight today as per the Indian Standard time.

Gokulnath, a doctor by training, is an aerospace medicine professional working with the Army in Nashik. He was timed out last year after pedalling at RAAM for nearly 3,000 km. Samarth, on the other side, completed the race in his earliest trial. Apart from Rizvi and Gokulnath, Sumit Patil from Alibag was the only one to have tried the race in the past.

Springing from the moderate weather on the Pacific Coast, the race opens the furnace-like Mojave Desert, crosses through parched Arizona, freezing mountain passes in Colorado, windy plains in Central America, and ultimately, the Appalachian Mountains test the riders before they reach the Atlantic coast on the east.

Gokulnath stood 7th amongst the nine men who finished whereas Samarth stood 8th. Christoph Strasser stood out as the winner of the race.

Team Sahyadri Cyclists, from Gokulnath’s hometown of Nashik, ceased the race in the 4-men category in eight days and ten hrs today.

According to PTI report, riders have to pedal over 400 km a day to finish the race in the stipulated 12 days. Fatigueness and hallucinations are not uncommon with so much unrest.

“I am relieved…that is the feeling I am going through right now,” said Lt Colonel Gokulnath at the finish line.

In the history of three-decade, only three Indians had endeavoured RAAM solo, however, none could reach the finish line. The first Indian to try RAAM solo, Samim Rizvi also participated this year but couldn’t complete. Gokulnath stated he went through the upheaval of emotions right from the inception of the race, which he called a relentless effort from the moment one signs up for it.

More than twelve Indian riders qualified for RAAM in the past decade through special rides that take place in different regions like the Deccan plateau, the Thar desert and the hills of southern India.

After qualifying the RAAM, one has to endure exhausting training sessions for several months and do simulated multi-day rides with a uniquely collected crew. One also requires for arranging the finances that run up to over Rs 20 lakh for the race and more for training, mentioned PTI report.

Satish Patki, who virtually introduced distance cycling in the country over a decade ago, congratulated the finishers saying the resources required make it an exclusive club, but there is a huge dormant for endurance riding in India too which can be traversed by conducting domestic races.

– prepared by Naina Mishra of Newsgram. Twitter: @Nainamishr94

 

 

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

Team Led by Indian-Origin Scientist Converts Plant Matter Into Chemicals

0
//
13
A team led by an Indian-origin scientist from Sandia National Laboratories in California has demonstrated a new technology based on bio-engineered bacteria that can make it economically feasible to produce chemicals from renewable plant sources.
Lignin, a tough plant matter, is converted into chemicals. Pixabay

A team led by an Indian-origin scientist from Sandia National Laboratories in California has demonstrated a new technology based on bio-engineered bacteria that can make it economically feasible to produce chemicals from renewable plant sources.

The technology converts tough plant matter, called lignin, for wider use of the energy source and making it cost competitive.

“For years, we have been researching cost-effective ways to break down lignin and convert it into valuable platform chemicals,” Sandia bioengineer Seema Singh said.

“We applied our understanding of natural lignin degraders to E. coli because that bacterium grows fast and can survive harsh industrial processes,” she added in the work published in the “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America”.

Lignin is the component of plant cell walls that gives them their incredible strength. It is brimming with energy but getting to that energy is so costly and complex that the resulting biofuel can’t compete economically with other forms of transportation energy.

A team led by an Indian-origin scientist from Sandia National Laboratories in California has demonstrated a new technology based on bio-engineered bacteria that can make it economically feasible to produce chemicals from renewable plant sources.
Scientists successfully convert plant matter into chemicals. Pixabay

Once broken down, lignin has other gifts to give in the form of valuable platform chemicals that can be converted into nylon, plastics, pharmaceuticals and other valuable products.

Singh and her team have solved three problems with turning lignin into platform chemicals: cost, toxicity and speed.

Apply Pays Fine: Out of Total Tax Fine of $15 billion, Apple Pays $1.77 billion to Irish Government 

Engineering solutions like these, which overcome toxicity and efficiency issues have the potential to make biofuel production economically viable.

“Now we can work on producing greater quantities of platform chemicals, engineering pathways to new end products, and considering microbial hosts other than E. coli,” Singh (IANS)