Monday January 27, 2020

EXCLUSIVE: ‘Stay Alive’ – This Heart Wrenching Silent Film on Depression Speaks Volumes!

The mute psychological film illustrates emotional imbalance of a depressed person through mere facial expressions but throbs the heart at the very first sight

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A short film on depression
Stay Alive Film Poster

– by Naina Mishra

June 20, 2017:

Suicidal tendencies in adolescents are surging rapidly and taking a severe toll nowadays, and one of the prime reasons for suicides is Depression. It is a detrimental state of mind which begins to incubate in at a very early age. There comes a time in life when misery becomes inconsolable. Many people experience such an agonizing time in life and coming out of with sanity is a matter of endurance. What many do not understand is the magnitude of time, which has the power to heal the wounds caused by distress.

In the uproar of the gravest issue, a Chandigarh-based Filmmaker, Amit Chauhan took the stance to bring awareness among the youth about depression with a Short Film titled “Stay Alive” to rear the youths with a positive frame of mind and help them deal with dejection.

Newsgram is the official media partner with “STAY ALIVE” directed by Amit Chauhan Film Co, starring Shweta Sharma as the protagonist.

The teaser of the film is out on social media and has already occupied a space of its own. The mute psychological film illustrates emotional imbalance of a depressed person through mere facial expressions but throbs the heart at the very first sight.

[bctt tweet=”Stay Alive is a mute psychological movie based on depression and suicide.” username=”NewsGramdotcom”]

“A lot of my friends committed suicide as they were very depressed. I have myself seen my father in a bad phase owing to a chronic disease and it was really difficult for me to cope with it. In earlier times, people were connected with each other but now our society has become materialistic and has succumbed to superficial evil. People have high end expectations from life which they do not speak about and feel miserable in the end. It is pertinent to talk about the issue and come up with an immediate solution. People should talk it out with anyone they feel comfortable with. It is all about a positive outlook towards life, one wrong step can leave an irrecoverable loss to the near and dear ones. It is important to stay alive” – Amit Chauhan, Director of Stay Alive

 

Watch Teaser | Stay Alive

Newsgram brings to you an exclusive interview with the lead actress of the film, Shweta Sharma. She has earlier appeared on Punjabi Film ‘Rabb Da Radio’. The actress is known for her roles in various social documentaries. She was featured in an advertisement on Safety and Security with the famous comedian on Kapil show, Chandan Prabhakar. Her upcoming project includes a series based on ISIS, a terror group in Syria.

Naina: The film has no dialogues, how difficult was it to express through only facial expressions?

Shweta:  Acting has no language and I truly abide by this. I am an artist who has exhibit the feeling through expressions, which is a part of acting. It was not difficult for me to express through facial expressions because I could feel the trauma of depression afflicted on young boys and girls. I simply connected with them.

Naina: Can you talk about the issue which the film is highlighting?

Shweta: Stay Alive is a mute psychological movie based on depression and suicide. It’s an awareness movie for the people who are suffering mentally and stuck up in their thoughts for years. The message of the movie is very clear and beautiful at the end which is “never lose hope”. Rest you can see when it will be released.

Naina: Did you ever face depression in your life?

Shweta: No, I haven’t faced it and I wish nobody faces this mental illness. I have seen my Grand Mother suffering from depression and it was heartbreaking to see her. I still remember, I was 18 years old and used to see her passing through the difficult phase. I have observed her and imitated in the film, recalling those times has always been gloomy for me.

Naina: What social message would you like to convey to the audience?

Shweta: I would like to tell all the people out there to never lose hope in life. We have forgotten ourselves in the chaotic city life. Take a wide look around and look for people whose behavior appears abnormal to you. Help people combat their inner web of melancholy thoughts. You might just save someone’s life.

“Stay Alive” is releasing on 25th July in association with Newsgram.

Life is a gift of God but we forget the essence of it and starts tearing ourselves. All we can do is play our part and make a constant effort to make our lives better and stay alive.

 


NewsGram is a Chicago-based non-profit media organization. We depend upon support from our readers to maintain our objective reporting. Show your support by Donating to NewsGram. Donations to NewsGram are tax-exempt. 
 

Next Story

Here’s how Cyberbullying Leads to Depression Among Youngsters

Online bullying more horrifying, leads to depression in youths

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Online bullying depression
Cyberbullying amplifyies symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder in young people. Pixabay

As researchers have found that cyberbullying amplifyies symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder in young people, health experts here also stressed that in some cases it can be far more horrifying than physical bullying.

According to the experts, cyberbullying is when a child, teen or youngster becomes a target of actions by others — using computers, cellphones or other devices — that are intended to embarrass, humiliate, torment, threaten or harass.

It can start as early as age eight or nine, but the majority of cyberbullying cases take place in the teenage years, up to age 17.

The new study, published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, addressed both the prevalence and factors related to cyberbullying in adolescent inpatients.

Online bullying depression
From setting beauty standards and norms to trolling every act has a significant effect on the psyche of internet users, especially on youth and children, it leads to stress and depression. Pixabay

“Even against a backdrop of emotional challenges in the kids we studied, we noted cyberbullying had an adverse impact. It’s real and should be assessed,” said study co-author Philip D. Harvey, Professor at University of Miami in the US.

According to the researchers, children with a history of being abused were found to be more likely to be cyberbullied.

The study of 50 adolescent psychiatric inpatients aged 13 to 17 examined the prevalence of cyberbullying and related it to social media usage, current levels of symptoms and histories of adverse early life experience.

Conducted from September 2016 to April 2017, the research team asked participants to complete two childhood trauma questionnaires and a cyberbullying questionnaire.

Twenty per cent of participants reported that they had been cyberbullied within the last two months before their admission.

According to the researchers, half of the participants were bullied by text messages and half on Facebook.

Transmitted pictures or videos, Instagram, instant messages and chat rooms were other cyberbullying vehicles, the study said.

Online bullying depression
Children with a history of being abused suffer from depression. Pixabay

Those who were bullied had significantly higher severity of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, anger, and fantasy dissociation than those who were not bullied.

According to findings, participants who reported being cyberbullied also reported significantly higher levels of lifetime emotional abuse on the study’s Childhood Trauma Questionnaire than those who were not bullied.

The internet not only covers the huge part of our lives nowadays, rather it actually dominates today’s generations’ lives, according to the expert.

“From setting beauty standards and norms to trolling every act has a significant effect on the psyche of internet users, especially on youth and children, it leads to stress and depression as well,” Mrinmay Kumar Das, Senior Consultant, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Jaypee Hospital in Noida, told IANS.

Also Read- Full Vaccination of Children Reduces the Risk of Hospitalisation: Study

To reduce the risk of falling in this trap, Das suggested: “Keep an eye on the people you interact with online, keep your personal information or private details safe. Also keep in mind that your children who apparently act normal may also be dealing with cyber bullying.”

“Hence keep communicating with your children, rather than scolding them and forcefully limiting their internet use, support them to come out of this depressing phase, encourage them to indulge in other activities like games, music, etc,” Das added. (IANS)