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‘Stay Alive’: The Mute Psychological Film on Depression Releases on July 25

Depression is neither seen nor heard, it is just felt with silent cries

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Stay Alive
STAY Alive Film Poster
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– by Naina Mishra

Chandigarh, July 25, 2017: ‘Stay Alive’, the mute psychological movie starring Shweta Sharma as the protagonist is all set to be released today. The eight-minute long mute film will highlight the traumatic effects of a depressive person. Needless to say, depression is a sensitive issue which needs an awareness.

Shweta Sharma is the lead actress in the movie Stay Alive

Shweta Sharma told Newsgram, “I am very optimistic about the response from the audience. It will connect with them psychologically. Although it is eight minutes film, every minute of it accentuates the afflictions of depression”.

The actress has done street plays for social message financed by the world bank. She has also been an active member of NGO “Aashrey”.

ALSO READ: ‘Stay Alive’ – This Heart Wrenching Silent Film on Depression Speaks Volumes! 

Newsgram is the official media partner with “STAY ALIVE” directed by Amit Chauhan Film Co. The film has also been selected for Singapore International Film Festival, Lexus short films, and Downturn Urban Arts Films Festival.

Amit Chauhan is also working on the pre production of Hindi feature film titled as “Hell Kite”.

Depression is neither seen nor heard, it is just felt with silent cries. Not just that, in the recent times, it has become more of an epidemic. This is also the main reason why Amit Chauhan chose to display depression without the use of words. Because in reality, depression cannot be described in words.

-by Naina Mishra of Newsgram. Twitter @Nainamishr94


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Depression in Children Stay Undetected by Parents and Teachers- Study

The gold standard for identifying children who might be at risk for developing depression later in life is to ask the children themselves

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Studies: More Green Space, Less Crime, Depression in Poor Areas Pixabay

Parents and teachers may find it difficult to detect depression in young children, that can affect their social skills and academics, a new study shows.

According to Anxiety and Depression Association of America, as many as 2-3 per cent of children aged between 6-12 might have a major depressive disorder.

But parents and teachers face difficulties in recognising depression in children.

The findings, appearing in the Journal of School Psychology, showed that children who show mild to severe symptoms of depression in second and third grades are six times more likely to have skill deficits, such as difficulties with social skills or academics, than children without symptoms.

However, when teachers and parents were asked to rate a child’s level of depression, there was only about 5-10 per cent overlap in their ratings.

Depression
Parents and teachers face difficulties in recognising depression in children. Pixabay

“Some people would view that overlap as the truth about a child’s well-being and areas of disagreement as errors, but we need to explore the possibility that each of them are seeing different aspects of children’s behaviour and mental health,” said Keith Herman, professor in the University of Missouri (MU), College of Education.

For the study, the team completed profile analyses of 643 children in early elementary school to explore how patterns between student, teacher and parent reporting can be used to gain a holistic picture of a child’s mental health.

Herman suggested that mental health professionals could work with teachers and parents to identify depressive symptoms early by including self reports from children in mental health evaluations.

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“The gold standard for identifying children who might be at risk for developing depression later in life is to ask the children themselves,” noted Herman.

“However, even if a child doesn’t say they feel depressed, certain outward behaviours might provide clues to the state of the child’s mental health. It’s important for teachers and parents to catch these behaviours early to prevent long-term problems that occur with depression,” he said. (IANS)