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‘Stay Alive’: The Mute Psychological Film on Depression Releases on July 25

Depression is neither seen nor heard, it is just felt with silent cries

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Stay Alive
STAY Alive Film Poster

– by Naina Mishra

Chandigarh, July 25, 2017: ‘Stay Alive’, the mute psychological movie starring Shweta Sharma as the protagonist is all set to be released today. The eight-minute long mute film will highlight the traumatic effects of a depressive person. Needless to say, depression is a sensitive issue which needs an awareness.

Shweta Sharma is the lead actress in the movie Stay Alive

Shweta Sharma told Newsgram, “I am very optimistic about the response from the audience. It will connect with them psychologically. Although it is eight minutes film, every minute of it accentuates the afflictions of depression”.

The actress has done street plays for social message financed by the world bank. She has also been an active member of NGO “Aashrey”.

ALSO READ: ‘Stay Alive’ – This Heart Wrenching Silent Film on Depression Speaks Volumes! 

Newsgram is the official media partner with “STAY ALIVE” directed by Amit Chauhan Film Co. The film has also been selected for Singapore International Film Festival, Lexus short films, and Downturn Urban Arts Films Festival.

Amit Chauhan is also working on the pre production of Hindi feature film titled as “Hell Kite”.

Depression is neither seen nor heard, it is just felt with silent cries. Not just that, in the recent times, it has become more of an epidemic. This is also the main reason why Amit Chauhan chose to display depression without the use of words. Because in reality, depression cannot be described in words.

-by Naina Mishra of Newsgram. Twitter @Nainamishr94


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Playing Game of Mahjong may be the Answer to Depression

Global economic and epidemiologic trends have led to significant increases in the burden of mental health among older adults

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Game, Mahjong, Depression
A study published in the journal Social Science & Medicine says that regularly playing the popular tile-based strategy game - mahjong - was one of several types of social participation linked to reduced rates of depression among middle-aged and older adults in China. Pixabay

When it comes to reducing depression risk among middle-aged and older adults in China, playing a game of mahjong may be the answer, according to new research.

A study published in the journal Social Science & Medicine says that regularly playing the popular tile-based strategy game – mahjong – was one of several types of social participation linked to reduced rates of depression among middle-aged and older adults in China.

“Global economic and epidemiologic trends have led to significant increases in the burden of mental health among older adults, especially in the low and middle income countries,” said study co-author Adam Chen, Associate Professor at University of Georgia.

Poor mental health is a major issue in China, which accounts for 17 per cent of the global disease burden of mental disorders.

Game, Mahjong, Depression
When it comes to reducing depression risk among middle-aged and older adults in China, playing a game of mahjong may be the answer, according to new research. Pixabay

For the study, the research team analysed survey data from nearly 11,000 residents aged 45 years and older from the nationally representative China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study.

They looked at symptoms of depression and compared it to the type and frequency of social participation, including visiting with friends, playing mahjong, participating in a sport or social club, and volunteering in the community.

They found that, on the whole, participating in a wide variety of activities more frequently was associated with better mental health.

Specifically, urban residents who played mahjong, a popular strategy game, were less likely to feel depressed.

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“What is more surprising is that mahjong playing does not associate with better mental health among rural elderly respondents. One hypothesis is that mahjong playing tends to be more competitive and at times become a means of gambling in rural China,” Chen added. (IANS)