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‘Stay Alive’: The Mute Psychological Film on Depression Releases on July 25

Depression is neither seen nor heard, it is just felt with silent cries

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Stay Alive
STAY Alive Film Poster
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– by Naina Mishra

Chandigarh, July 25, 2017: ‘Stay Alive’, the mute psychological movie starring Shweta Sharma as the protagonist is all set to be released today. The eight-minute long mute film will highlight the traumatic effects of a depressive person. Needless to say, depression is a sensitive issue which needs an awareness.

Shweta Sharma is the lead actress in the movie Stay Alive

Shweta Sharma told Newsgram, “I am very optimistic about the response from the audience. It will connect with them psychologically. Although it is eight minutes film, every minute of it accentuates the afflictions of depression”.

The actress has done street plays for social message financed by the world bank. She has also been an active member of NGO “Aashrey”.

ALSO READ: ‘Stay Alive’ – This Heart Wrenching Silent Film on Depression Speaks Volumes! 

Newsgram is the official media partner with “STAY ALIVE” directed by Amit Chauhan Film Co. The film has also been selected for Singapore International Film Festival, Lexus short films, and Downturn Urban Arts Films Festival.

Amit Chauhan is also working on the pre production of Hindi feature film titled as “Hell Kite”.

Depression is neither seen nor heard, it is just felt with silent cries. Not just that, in the recent times, it has become more of an epidemic. This is also the main reason why Amit Chauhan chose to display depression without the use of words. Because in reality, depression cannot be described in words.

-by Naina Mishra of Newsgram. Twitter @Nainamishr94


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Are bullied kids prone to suicidal behaviour?

Children who experienced severe peer victimisation were more than twice as likely to report depression or low moods at age 15, and three times more likely to report anxiety

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Victimization in early school days leads to anxiety. Pixabay
Victimization in early school days leads to anxiety. Pixabay
  • Children face most severe levels of victimization from the beginning of their schooling.
  • These kids develop significant symptoms of suicidal behaviour and anxiety.
  • Even after the victimization ends, it affects still pertains.

A study found that children who face bullying can be at a risk of developing mental health issues, suicidal thoughts and anxiety in their years. For the study, the team looked at 1,363 children who were followed until the age of 15 years.

About 59 percent of participants had experienced some peer victimisation in the first years of elementary school, although it generally declined as the children grew older.

“Our findings showed a general tendency, in about 15 percent of the children, of being exposed to the most severe levels of victimisation from the beginning of their education until the transition to high school,” said Marie-Claude Geoffroy, from the McGill University in Canada.

Also Read: Anxiety and depression genetic, says research

Even though victimization can end after school days, its affect still pertains. Pixabay
Even though victimization can end after school days, its affect still pertains. Pixabay

Findings

  • Children who experienced severe peer victimisation were more than twice as likely to report depression or low moods at age 15, and three times more likely to report anxiety.
  • This group of children were also 3.5 times more likely to report serious suicidal thoughts or attempt suicide.

“Those children were at greater risk of debilitating depressive/dysthymic symptoms or anxiety and of suicidality in adolescence than less severely victimised children, even after we accounted for a plethora of confounders assessed throughout childhood,” Geoffroy added.

Also read: List of 8 Food Items to Battle Depression and Anxiety

“Although peer victimisation starts to decrease by the end of childhood, individuals in the severe trajectory group were still being exposed to the highest level of victimisation in early adolescence,” Geoffroy noted.

Severe peer victimisation may contribute to the development of mental health problems in adolescence, thus, it is important to prevent victimisation early in the lifespan, the results suggest.

The study was published in journal CMAJ. (IANS)

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