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Steps in Getting a Medical Marijuana Card

If you want to explore the possibilities that cannabis as a medicine has to offer, here are the steps in obtaining one

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Medical, Marijuana, Card
This card is a recommendation from a state-certified doctor that enables a patient to acquire marijuana within allowable limits. Pixabay

 

The United States is now at the dawn of a new era where alternative medicine is garnering equal attention as its pharmaceutical counterpart. One such alternative is medical marijuana. Several studies have shown the positive effects of marijuana in the treatment and management of diseases such as epilepsy, cancer, and HIV. Medical.

Federal law still has not legalised marijuana, but there are now 33 states in the US that have legalized marijuana for medical purposes. Each state has its set of unique guidelines, but the common factor is the need for a Medical Marijuana Card (MMID) to purchase and possess cannabis.

This card is a recommendation from a state-certified doctor that enables a patient to acquire marijuana within allowable limits. If you want to explore the possibilities that cannabis as a medicine has to offer, here are the steps in obtaining one. 

  • Study the Restrictions and Limitations of the State you Belong To

Medical, Marijuana, Card
Federal law still has not legalised marijuana, but there are now 33 states in the US that have legalized marijuana for medical purposes. Pixabay

Not all state rules on marijuana usage are the same. Some are more lenient than others. Find out the regulatory body governing the regulation of medical marijuana in your state. From there, you will already know if you are a perfect candidate for a Medical Marijuana Card.

For example, the state of Oklahoma does not have a list of qualifying conditions. It means that as long as the doctor gives a recommendation, you can get an MMID. On the other hand, in Ohio, you need to be diagnosed with a disease that belongs to the list of qualifying conditions. While in New Jersey, you could get a card for anxiety but could not in nearby New York.

  • Gather and Organize All Your Medical Records

Almost all states require a review of your medical records. It is to determine if your injury or disease can get treated by medical marijuana. Your medical history will help doctors formulate a workable treatment plan that will involve the use of cannabis. Make sure to include all diagnostic tests and hospitalization records.

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  • Prepare a Proof of Residency

For you to be able to enjoy the benefits that your state provides when it comes to medical marijuana usage, you must show acceptable proof of residency. A passport or a driver’s license is the best form of identification that you can provide.

  • Register to a Medical Marijuana Network

A medical marijuana network will help you search for the perfect doctor for your needs. You do not have to spend too much time researching for the correct match within your area. This network will connect you to a cannabis advocate who can patiently weigh in on your condition. 

Medical, Marijuana, Card
Each state has its set of unique guidelines, but the common factor is the need for a Medical Marijuana Card (MMID) to purchase. Pixabay

After your diagnosis, the physician will provide a recommendation. You may already use this recommendation to purchase marijuana. However, some states would entail you to apply for an MMID through their governing body. You will need to attach your doctor’s recommendation in your application.

  • Find Out the Expiry Date of your Card

Some states allow patients to use their cards for a year, while some for only six months. Take note of the expiry date so you will not be penalized for illegal possession of marijuana. Renew your license a month before it expires. It will ensure the continuous and effective treatment of your ailments.

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With medical marijuana, more patients have a chance to receive all possible modes of treatment. But just like any other medicine, marijuana needs to be prescribed and dispensed with utmost care and prudence. The MMID will ensure that this powerful herb will go to the right hands.

 

Next Story

Cannabis Usage Common in Adults with Pain Disorders: Study

Cannabis use disorder more common in adults with pain

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Cannabis adults
Researchers have found that non-medical use of cannabis including frequent or problematic use is much more common in adults who have pain than in others. Pixabay

Researchers have found that non-medical use of cannabis including frequent or problematic use is much more common in adults who have pain than in others.

Since 1996, 34 US states have passed medical marijuana laws and 11 states have legalised recreational cannabis use.

Studies indicate that heavy cannabis use increases the risk of vehicle accidents, respiratory and psychiatric symptoms, and cannabis use disorder.

“Despite this evidence, many people view cannabis use as harmless, and non-medical use of cannabis on a daily or near-daily basis has increased,” said study lead author Deborah Hasin from Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons in the US.

“In our study, we hoped to identify factors–such as pain–that may increase the risk of cannabis use disorder,” Hasin added.

Cannabis adults
66 per cent of adults now view marijuana as beneficial for pain management, the researchers said. Pixabay

For the findings, published in the American Journal of Psychiatry, research team analysed data on marijuana use from the National Epidemiologic Surveys on Alcohol and Related Conditions in 2001-2002 and 2012-2013.

The researchers compared non-medical cannabis use patterns in adults with and without pain (approximately 20 per cent of participants in both surveys had moderate to severe pain).

Overall, non-medical marijuana use increased from about four per cent in 2002 to 9.5 per cent in 2013.

In addition, in the most recent survey, those with pain were significantly more likely to engage in frequent non-medical cannabis use than those without pain (5.0 per cent vs. 3.5 per cent).

According to the researchers, the risk of cannabis use disorder was also significantly higher in those with pain (4.2 per cent vs. 2.7 per cent).

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Although meta-analyses of cannabis for treating pain show only mixed efficacy, particularly for plant marijuana, 66 per cent of adults now view marijuana as beneficial for pain management, the researchers said.

“Given that about 20 of the adult population experienced moderate to severe pain, this puts a large group of US adults at risk for frequent non-medical use and cannabis use disorder,” Hasin said. (IANS)