Tuesday April 23, 2019

Study Reveals, Stomach Issues A Result Of Psychosocial Deprivation At Early Ages

The study found that children with past caregiving disruptions showed higher levels of symptoms, including stomach aches, constipation, vomiting and nausea

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"Our study is among the first to link disruption of a child's gastrointestinal microbiome triggered by early-life adversity with brain activity in regions associated with emotional health," said Bridget Callaghan, postdoctoral candidate at the varsity.. Pixabay

If your child is suffering from trauma or extreme psychosocial deprivation, then s/he is at risk of developing stomach issues later which could affect the brain and behaviour, finds a new study.

The study found that children with past caregiving disruptions showed higher levels of symptoms, including stomach aches, constipation, vomiting and nausea.

In addition, they had distinctly different gut microbiomes from those raised with biological caregivers from birth, said the study published in the journal Development and Psychopathology.

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“It is too early to say anything conclusive, but our study indicates that adversity-associated changes in the gut microbiome are related to brain function, including differences in the regions of the brain associated with emotional processing,” said Tottenham. Pixabay

Children raised by parents had increased gut microbiome diversity, which is linked to the prefrontal cortex — a region of the brain known to help regulate emotions.

“One common reason children show up at doctors’ offices is intestinal complaints. Our findings indicate that gastrointestinal symptoms in young children could be a red flag to primary care physicians for future emotional health problems,” said Nim Tottenham, Professor Columbia University in the US.

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Children raised by parents had increased gut microbiome diversity, which is linked to the prefrontal cortex — a region of the brain known to help regulate emotions. Pixabay

“Our study is among the first to link disruption of a child’s gastrointestinal microbiome triggered by early-life adversity with brain activity in regions associated with emotional health,” said Bridget Callaghan, postdoctoral candidate at the varsity.

For the study, 115 children adopted from orphanages or foster care homes on or before approximately they were two years old and 229 children raised by a biological caregiver were analysed.

Also Read: The Deadly Face Off Over 5G in Cambodia Between U.S. And China
“It is too early to say anything conclusive, but our study indicates that adversity-associated changes in the gut microbiome are related to brain function, including differences in the regions of the brain associated with emotional processing,” said Tottenham.

Although more research is needed, this study helps to fill in an important gap in the literature, the team noted. (IANS)

Next Story

Two-Wave U.S. Flu Season is Now the Longest in Ten Years

Still, this flu season is not nearly as bad as last winter's 19-week season, the deadliest in at least four decades. An estimated 80,000 Americans died of flu and its complications last season.

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Emergency room nurse Christine Bauer treats Joshua Lagade of Vista, California, for the flu in the emergency room at Palomar Medical Center in Escondido, California, U.S., Jan.18, 2018. VOA

Three months ago, this flu season was shaping up to be short and mild in the U.S. But a surprising second viral wave has made it the longest in 10 years.

This flu season has been officially going for 21 weeks, according to reports collected through last week and released Friday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That makes it among the longest seen since the government started tracking flu season duration more than 20 years ago.

Some experts likened the unusual double waves to having two different flu seasons compressed, back-to-back, into one.

“I don’t remember a season like this,” said Dr. Arnold Monto, a University of Michigan researcher who had been studying respiratory illnesses for more than 50 years.

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Still, this flu season is not nearly as bad as last winter’s 19-week season, the deadliest in at least four decades. An estimated 80,000 Americans died of flu and its complications last season. VOA

The previous longest recent flu season was 20 weeks, which occurred in 2014-2015.

Flu can cause a miserable, relatively mild illness in many people and a more severe illness in others. Young children and the elderly are at greatest risk from flu and its complications. Flu vaccinations are recommended annually for all but the very young.

The current season began the week of Thanksgiving, a typical start time. At the beginning, most illnesses were caused by a flu strain that tends not to cause as many hospitalizations and which is more easily controlled by vaccines.

But in mid-February, a nastier strain started causing more illnesses and driving up hospitalizations.

Not helping matters: The harsher bug is not well matched to the vaccine, said the CDC’s Lynnette Brammer, who oversees flu tracking.

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Some experts likened the unusual double waves to having two different flu seasons compressed, back-to-back, into one. Pixabay

Still, this flu season is not nearly as bad as last winter’s 19-week season, the deadliest in at least four decades. An estimated 80,000 Americans died of flu and its complications last season.

Also Read: Study Claims, Your Moral Decisions Link To Brain Activity

The CDC is estimating that flu-related deaths this season in the range of 35,000 to 55,000.

More good news: Brammer said that although the virus is notoriously unpredictable, signs suggest this flu season should be over soon.

“It’s on the verge” of being over, she said. “If nothing changes.” (VOA)