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Stop Lecturing And Demonizing India over its Plan to Deport 40,000 Stateless Rohingya Muslims: Minister

The Rohingya are denied citizenship in Myanmar and classified as illegal immigrants, despite claiming centuries-old roots

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Rohingya refugee girl
Rohingya refugee watch children attend madrass in a temporary shelter on the outskirts of Jammu, India, Wednesday, Aug.16,2017. VOA
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  • Rights groups, including Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International, have slammed India’s deportation plan as “outrageous”
  • The government says the Rohingya Muslims are illegal immigrants and should deported because they pose a potential security threat
  • There is no other country in the world which hosts so many refugees, so don’t demonize us, don’t give us lecture
Rights groups should stop lecturing and demonizing India over its plan to deport 40,000 stateless Rohingya and recognize that the country has treated millions of refugees from across the world humanely, a senior official said this week.

 

Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s right-wing government says the Rohingya Muslims who have fled to India because of persecution in Buddhist-majority Myanmar are illegal immigrants and should deported because they pose a potential security threat.

“India is the most humane nation in the world,” said junior interior minister Kiren Rijiju, defending an order to states to identify and deport the Rohingya — including 16,500 registered with the U.N. refugee agency (UNHCR).

“There is no other country in the world which hosts so many refugees, so don’t demonize us, don’t give us lecture,” Rijiju said.

Hundreds of thousands have fled Myanmar, where they are marginalized and sometimes subjected to communal violence, with many taking refuge in Bangladesh — and some then crossing a porous border into Hindu-majority India.

FILE - Children of Rohingya refugees attend a temporary school run by a nongovernmental organization at a camp for Rohingyas in New Delhi, India, Aug. 16, 2017.
FILE – Children of Rohingya refugees attend a temporary school run by a nongovernmental organization at a camp for Rohingyas in New Delhi, India, Aug. 16, 2017. VOA

On Monday, Myanmar security forces intensified operations against Rohingya insurgents, following three days of clashes with militants in the worst violence involving the Muslim minority in five years.

Indian minister Rijiju said registration with the UNHCR was irrelevant.

India is not a signatory to the 1951 Refugee Convention, which spells out states’ responsibilities toward refugees. Nor does it have a domestic law to protect refugees.

ALSO READ: Refugees in India Looming For Basic Rights: Here Is Why India Needs Refugee Law! 

The Rohingya will be sent back from India in a humane way, following due legal processes, Rijiju added.

“We are not going to shoot them, nor are we planning to throw them in the ocean,” he said Monday.

Rights groups, including Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International, have slammed India’s deportation plan as “outrageous.”

Asia’s third-largest economy is bound by customary international law — the principle of non-refoulement — where it cannot forcibly return refugees to a place where they face danger, they say. (VOA)

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Trump Calls For Deporting Illegal Immigrants With No Court Hearings

"Democrats, fix the laws. Don’t RESIST," Trump said

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Migrants seeking to enter the United States
Migrants seeking to enter the United States. VOA

U.S. President Donald Trump called Sunday for immediately deporting illegal immigrants entering the United States with “no Judges or Court Cases.”

In a string of Twitter comments, Trump declared, “We cannot allow all of these people to invade our Country…,” contending that “Our system is a mockery to good immigration policy and Law and Order.”

The U.S. leader claimed that the U.S. immigration law is “laughed at all over the world, is very unfair to all of those people who have gone through the system legally and are waiting on line for years.”

The United States for years has granted court hearings to migrants fleeing from Mexico and Central American countries, and from elsewhere in the world, and looking for better economic fortunes in the United States.

Trump’s tough demand to end that legal process would face stiff opposition in Congress, which for years has been stalemated on changes to U.S. immigration policies and unable to enact new migration laws.

He said, “When somebody comes in, we must immediately, with no Judges or Court Cases, bring them back from where they came.”

He renewed his demand that “Immigration must be based on merit – we need people who will help to Make America Great Again!”

President Donald Trump speaks about immigration alongside family members affected by crimes committed by undocumented immigrants, at the South Court Auditorium on the White House complex, June 22, 2018, in Washington
President Donald Trump speaks about immigration alongside family members affected by crimes committed by undocumented immigrants, at the South Court Auditorium on the White House complex, June 22, 2018, in Washington, VOA

Earlier, Trump again blamed opposition Democrats for the impasse over U.S. immigration policies

“Democrats, fix the laws. Don’t RESIST,” Trump said on Twitter. He declared that his administration is “doing a far better job” than that of former presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama in controlling illegal immigration, “but we need strength and security at the Border! Cannot accept all of the people trying to break into our Country. Strong Borders, No Crime!”

Republican Senator Ron Johnson, chairman of the Senate Homeland Security Committee, told CNN, “This is a mess that goes back decades. We don’t have the capacity to handle all the migrants showing up” at the U.S. border.

The Republican-controlled House of Representatives is still planning to vote this week on comprehensive immigration policy changes after last week defeating a tougher version of new immigration controls.

Trump supported both of the bills being considered by the House, but then said Republican lawmakers were wasting their time and should abandon the effort until after the November elections in hopes that Republicans would increase the majorities they hold in both chambers and would have an easier time passing immigration policy changes to their liking.

Also read:Why Does Trump Separate Families, A Policy Or A Law? 

Democrats, however, have hopes of retaking control of at least one of the chambers, with U.S. analysts say they have a better chance of regaining control of the House, where all 435 seats are being contested. (VOA)