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Stop Lecturing And Demonizing India over its Plan to Deport 40,000 Stateless Rohingya Muslims: Minister

The Rohingya are denied citizenship in Myanmar and classified as illegal immigrants, despite claiming centuries-old roots

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Rohingya refugee girl
Rohingya refugee watch children attend madrass in a temporary shelter on the outskirts of Jammu, India, Wednesday, Aug.16,2017. VOA
  • Rights groups, including Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International, have slammed India’s deportation plan as “outrageous”
  • The government says the Rohingya Muslims are illegal immigrants and should deported because they pose a potential security threat
  • There is no other country in the world which hosts so many refugees, so don’t demonize us, don’t give us lecture
Rights groups should stop lecturing and demonizing India over its plan to deport 40,000 stateless Rohingya and recognize that the country has treated millions of refugees from across the world humanely, a senior official said this week.

 

Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s right-wing government says the Rohingya Muslims who have fled to India because of persecution in Buddhist-majority Myanmar are illegal immigrants and should deported because they pose a potential security threat.

“India is the most humane nation in the world,” said junior interior minister Kiren Rijiju, defending an order to states to identify and deport the Rohingya — including 16,500 registered with the U.N. refugee agency (UNHCR).

“There is no other country in the world which hosts so many refugees, so don’t demonize us, don’t give us lecture,” Rijiju said.

Hundreds of thousands have fled Myanmar, where they are marginalized and sometimes subjected to communal violence, with many taking refuge in Bangladesh — and some then crossing a porous border into Hindu-majority India.

FILE - Children of Rohingya refugees attend a temporary school run by a nongovernmental organization at a camp for Rohingyas in New Delhi, India, Aug. 16, 2017.
FILE – Children of Rohingya refugees attend a temporary school run by a nongovernmental organization at a camp for Rohingyas in New Delhi, India, Aug. 16, 2017. VOA

On Monday, Myanmar security forces intensified operations against Rohingya insurgents, following three days of clashes with militants in the worst violence involving the Muslim minority in five years.

Indian minister Rijiju said registration with the UNHCR was irrelevant.

India is not a signatory to the 1951 Refugee Convention, which spells out states’ responsibilities toward refugees. Nor does it have a domestic law to protect refugees.

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The Rohingya will be sent back from India in a humane way, following due legal processes, Rijiju added.

“We are not going to shoot them, nor are we planning to throw them in the ocean,” he said Monday.

Rights groups, including Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International, have slammed India’s deportation plan as “outrageous.”

Asia’s third-largest economy is bound by customary international law — the principle of non-refoulement — where it cannot forcibly return refugees to a place where they face danger, they say. (VOA)

Next Story

Bangladesh Court Imposes Ban on Single-Use Plastic Products Across The Country

The plastic waste carried by the country's 54 rivers and generated in coastal regions were dumped into the Bay of Bengal, posing threat to marine resources and biodiversity

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Bangladesh
Bangladesh Court also ordered the concerned authorities to strictly enforce ban on polythene use across the country with proper monitoring. Pixabay

A Bangladesh court on Tuesday asked the government to ban single-use plastic products across the country within the next one year.

The High Court bench comprising Justice Moyeenul Islam Chowdhury and Justice Khandaker Diliruzzaman came up with the orderfollowing a writ petition jointly filed by 11 rights organizations, including Bangladesh Environmental Lawyers Association (BELA), reports Xinhua news agency.

The court also ordered the concerned authorities to strictly enforce ban on polythene use across the country with proper monitoring.

Advocate Syed Ahmed Kabir who appeared for the writ petitioners during the hearing, said polythene use was the total violation of Bangladesh Environment Conservation Act as it was banned in 2002.

But he said the use of plastic products like drinking straws, cotton buds, food packaging, food containers, bottles, plates, plastic cutlery and plastic bags was on the rise in the country.

Bangladesh
A Bangladesh court on Tuesday asked the government to ban single-use plastic products across the country within the next one year. Wikimedia Commons

The plastic waste carried by the country’s 54 rivers and generated in coastal regions were dumped into the Bay of Bengal, posing threat to marine resources and biodiversity, Kabir said, so 11 rights organizations submitted the writ petition before the High Court in this regard on December 17, 2019.

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The court also directed the authorities concerned to inform it within January 5, 2021 about what actions are taken to stop plastic use. (IANS)