Monday November 20, 2017

Why Worry? These Techniques will Teach How to be Happy!

Learn how to stop worrying with these simple strategies

0
24
How to stop worrying
Cluster of anxious thoughts. Pixabay

New Delhi, August 14, 2017: Worry is a story that we create inside and we use it to create fear. You tend to create fear of something which has to happen in the near future and by worrying, you deplete your strength and energy so much that by the time the situation arises, you would have made yourself already a weak person. What’s expected in such situations is to keep yourself strong so that you can face the situation and respond to the situation with an open mind.

Our every thought, every word and every action are our own creation. Circumstances come to us externally, but our responses are completely our choice. One must admit that there are some things in life which cannot be changed and problems will continue to persist, however, one must learn how to stop worrying.

How to Stop Worrying?

Worry is a delusion

You worry about things that ought to occur in the future. Worries are primarily the monsters you build in your head and are just in your head. It is a sheer misuse of your imagination. A single liberated thought devoid of tensions can make your day.

Incorporate mindfulness

The most efficient technique to stop worrying is to inculcate mindfulness, which involves nonjudgmental awareness of present thoughts and emotions. Make yourself consciously aware of the fact that worries are going to persist for an indefinite period of time but that should not take away your sanity. Also, have a deeper understanding of the fact that worries can never change the outcomes/end result, so deal with the situation rather wasting time and energy on ruminating.

Acceptance

Accepting worries help the person to move on and pass out the situation with ease. Those who are naturally more welcoming of their intrusive feelings are less obsessional, have lower levels of distress, and are less worried.

Gulping Sweets

Sweets are believed to enlighten the mood of the person. Devour your favorite sweets and forget about worries. Whenever a nerve racking thought occurs,  Go ahead and grab a chocolate bar.

Also Read: Planning to Set a Goal? Here’s What You Need to Know! 

Forest Therapy indulgence

Forest therapy promotes relaxation and reduces the activity of sympathetic nerves associated with “fight or flight” reactions to stress.

Pen down your worries

Penning down your own thought might be counterintuitive, but it’s almost similar to emptying the fears out of your mind. You tend to reevaluate that situation so that you’re less likely to worry about those situations.

Cooking is therapeutic

Cooking helps in combating stress and ease the stress levels. When you prepare a recipe, you only focus on one thing and by doing that you spend less time on worrying about issues that concern you.

[sociallocker][/sociallocker]

Soul awakening through meditation

Anxiety disorders are due to the repetitive, anxious, often baseless thoughts and worries about the future. However, practicing meditation awakens the soul and brings the mind to zero thoughts, which is imperative for the mind wanderers.

Keep the hands busy

Keeping your hands busy can help keep your mind off of worries.  Keeping your hands and mind working conflicts with storing and encoding visual images, which explains why worry beads and knitting calm us down.

Rational thinking

People tend to worry about things they have no control over. It doesn’t change the situation anyways. It is better to stay practical in such situations and so that you are able to respond to the situation open mindedly.


NewsGram is a Chicago-based non-profit media organization. We depend upon support from our readers to maintain our objective reporting. Show your support by Donating to NewsGram. Donations to NewsGram are tax-exempt. 

Next Story

Lack of Social Communication Skills may cause Increase in Health Problems

How can lack of Social communication skills affect your mental health?

0
43
Lack of Social Communication Skills may cause Increase in Health Problems
Lack of Social Communication Skills may cause Increase in Health Problems. Pixabay
  • Are you left out by your friends due to improper communicative techniques? Beware, as it may take a toll on your health. New research reveals that people with poor social skills may be at a greater risk of developing mental as well as physical health problems.

Importance of Social Communication Skills in avoiding Mental Health Problems

Social skills refer to the communication skills that allow people to interact effectively and appropriately with others. They are mostly learned over time, originating in the family and continuing throughout life.

The use of technology, like texting, is probably one of the biggest impediments to developing social skills among young people nowadays, the researchers said.

“We have known for a long time that social skills are associated with mental health problems like depression and anxiety,” said Chrin Segrin, a professor at the University of Arizona.

“But it was not known definitively that social skills were also predictive of poorer physical health. Two variables — loneliness and stress — appear to be the glue that bind poor social skills to health. People with poor social communication skills have high levels of stress and loneliness in their lives,” Segrin added.

The researchers studied over 775 people, aged between 18 to 91 years, and were provided a questionnaire addressing their social communication skills, stress, loneliness, and mental and physical health.

The results found that the participants who had deficits in those skills reported more stress, loneliness, and poorer mental and physical health.

The study, published in the journal Health Communication, mentioned that while the negative effects of stress on the body have been known for a long time, loneliness is a more recently recognized health risk factor. It is as serious a risk as smoking, obesity or eating a high-fat diet with lack of exercise.(IANS)

Next Story

A Strong Social Network Helps Reduce Marital Conflicts and Stress

Social networks may help provide protection against health problems brought about by ordinary tension between spouses

0
7
Marital conflict
Marital conflict between a couple. Pixabay

New York, Sep 17, 2017: Marital conflicts can take a toll on your health, but having even a few close friends and family members to turn to can help reduce the stress associated with such conflicts, new research suggests.

Social networks may help provide protection against health problems brought about by ordinary tension between spouses, said the study published online in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

“We found that having a satisfying social network buffers spouses from the harmful physiological effects of everyday marital conflicts,” said Lisa Neff, Associate Professor at the University of Texas at Austin in the US.

“Maintaining a few good friends is important to weathering the storms of your marriage,” Neff said.

The research looked at 105 newlywed couples who kept daily records of marital conflict in their home environment and completed questionnaires about the number, quality and characteristics of their connections with friends and family.

In addition, the couples participating in the study collected morning and evening saliva samples for cortisol testing every day for six days.

Cortisol levels over the course of the day are a measure of the stress response.

The overall number of friends and family members that study participants reported having did not appear to affect couples’ ability to handle conflicts nearly as much as the quality of those outside relationships.

Also Read: Married Trans Couples Experience Less Discrimination: Study 

The researchers found that people who reported having even a few close friends or family members to talk to outside of their marriage experienced lower levels of stress when marital conflicts arose.

“Even everyday conflict takes a toll on people physiologically,” Neff said.

“But we found that the association between marital conflict and cortisol responses completely disappears when people are happy and satisfied with their available social network,” Neff added. (IANS)

Next Story

Stressing Over Work? A New Study Says Expressive Writing Can help Brain Relax and Perform Tasks Efficiently

Expressive writing can not only help individuals process past traumas or stressful event but also prepare for stressful tasks in the future

0
20
expressive writing
Stressing over tasks is not going to help achieve targets. But turns out writing about it can. (Representational Image ), Pixabay

New York, September 15, 2017 : If the anxiety of performing an upcoming task is giving you stress, simply writing about your feelings may help you perform the task more efficiently, suggests new research.

The research – published online in the journal Psychophysiology — provides the first neural evidence for the benefits of expressive writing, said lead author Hans Schroder, a doctoral student in psychology at Michigan State University (MSU) in the US.

“Worrying takes up cognitive resources; it’s kind of like people who struggle with worry are constantly multitasking — they are doing one task and trying to monitor and suppress their worries at the same time,” Schroder said.

“Our findings show that if you get these worries out of your head through expressive writing, those cognitive resources are freed up to work toward the task you’re completing and you become more efficient,” Schroder said.

For the study, college students identified as chronically anxious through a validated screening measure completed a computer-based “flanker task” that measured their response accuracy and reaction times.

Before the task, about half of the participants wrote about their deepest thoughts and feelings about the upcoming task for eight minutes. The other half, in the control condition, wrote about what they did the day before.

While the two groups performed at about the same level for speed and accuracy, the expressive-writing group performed the flanker task more efficiently, meaning they used fewer brain resources, measured with electroencephalography, or EEG, in the process.

While much previous research has shown that expressive writing can help individuals process past traumas or stressful events, the current study suggests the same technique can help people — especially worriers — prepare for stressful tasks in the future.

“Expressive writing makes the mind work less hard on upcoming stressful tasks, which is what worriers often get ‘burned out’ over, their worried minds working harder and hotter,” Jason Moser, Associate Professor at MSU.

“This technique takes the edge off their brains so they can perform the task with a ‘cooler head,'” Moser added. (IANS)