Wednesday January 22, 2020

Avoid Storing Food in Aluminium Containers to Minimise Health Risks: Researchers

Cutting aluminium intake can minimise potential health risk

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Aluminium health
A high intake of aluminium compounds can have adverse health effects. Pixabay

Researchers have found that reducing the consumption of food kept in aluminium packaging can minimise the potential health risks.

A high intake of aluminium compounds can have adverse effects on your health, among other things, neurotoxic developmental disorders as well as damage the kidneys, liver and bones.

The BFR: Federal Institute for Risk Assessment in Germany, bases its assessment of the population’s aluminium intake from food on the latest consumption and concentration data.

According to the research, consumption data are collected through consumer surveys and provide information on which foods and how much of them are eaten by different consumer groups.

health aluminium
Reducing the consumption of food kept in aluminium containers can minimise the potential health risks. Pixabay

For the risk assessment of aluminium intake, the BfR uses the tolerable weekly intake (TWI) derived from the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) of 1 milligram aluminium per kilogram body weight.

The BfR’s assessment showed that aluminium intake from food is lower compared to previous studies.

If other relevant sources of aluminium intake are taken into account, such as aluminium containing cosmetic products and uncoated food contact materials, the total intake can exhaust or even exceed the TWI for all age groups.

Accroding to BFR, consumers can influence their aluminium intake. Those who want to reduce their aluminium intake should use aluminium containing antiperspirants and toothpaste sparingly.

When it comes to food, the BfR suggested a varied diet as well as alternating products and brands.

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This can contribute to reducing the risk of permanently high aluminium intake caused by individual highly contaminated products.

They advised against the preparation and storage of, in particular, acidic and salty foods in uncoated aluminium articles or aluminium foil. (IANS)

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Promotional E-Cigarettes Posts on Instagram Outnumber Anti-Vaping Content: Study

E-cigarette popular on Instagram despite anti-vaping content

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e-cigarettes
Despite "The Real Cost" awareness campaign launched by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2018, nearly one third of American teenagers are estimated to use e-cigarettes. Pixabay

Promotional e-cigarettes posts on popular photo-sharing platform Instagram outnumber anti-vaping content 10,000 to one, according to a new study and health news.

Despite “The Real Cost” awareness campaign launched by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2018, nearly one third of American teenagers are estimated to use e-cigarettes, the researchers said.

The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Communication, highlights the limited impact of the FDA campaign, while also using deep learning – an artificial intelligence method – to better understand the marketing tactics used by vaping companies.

“US public health officials have been calling vaping among youth an epidemic and have been putting a lot of effort into trying to stop this epidemic by introducing #TheRealCost anti-vaping campaign but this stark imbalance in the volume of posts has caused the FDA message to be overwhelmed by marketing from the vaping brands,” said study researcher Julia Vassey from University of California in the US.

e-cigarettes
Many teenagers continue to view e-cigarettes as healthier than conventional cigarettes, but vaping is associated with inflammation, reduced immune responses and breathing troubles. Pixabay

Many teenagers continue to view e-cigarettes as healthier than conventional cigarettes, but vaping is associated with inflammation, reduced immune responses and breathing troubles, the study said.

To further understand how vaping is perceived on social media, research team collected 245,894 Instagram posts spanning from before and after the #TheRealCost campaign launch.

The team also conducted interviews with five vaping influencers and eight college-age social media users. “We focused on Instagram because the vaping influencers we interviewed for this study identified Instagram as their most important social media marketing platform,” Vassey explained.

“Based on the results, the FDA anti-vaping campaign is not very popular and we saw Instagram user comments disputing the FDA claims of damaging health effects from nicotine and calling the campaign propaganda,” Vassey added.

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In contrast to the FDA’s intentions, the study found that vaping posts received nearly three times more “likes” after the campaign launch. They also found that there were six times as many posts that had greater than 100 likes.

According to the researchers, participants in the focus groups suggested that the anti-vaping campaign promoted scare tactics rather than offering guidance on how to quit vaping. (IANS)