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A food stall in Srinagar preparing deep fried puris. street food sinagar

Foods prepared or sold by vendors in streets and other public areas for immediate or later consumption without any additional processing or preparation are known as street foods. People in many parts of the world enjoy eating on the streets; something that leaves a lasting impression on their tongue and such kind of taste is difficult to obtain at home. There are certain street foods that are specific to an area, but there are plenty that have gone far beyond that region. Generally, street food is less expensive than restaurant meals.

There is a possibility that street food is unsanitary/ unhygienic. When serving food on the street, it might be difficult to maintain hygienic conditions because of the dust, filth, and pollution found in many areas. In comparison to water-based street food, deep-fried street food has a much lower germ count owing to the high temperatures, whereas water-based street food can include germs that can lead to different water-borne illnesses such as diarrhea or typhoid.


Roasted corn on charcoal There are certain street foods that are specific to an area, but there are plenty that have gone far beyond that region.Photo by Debashis RC Biswas on Unsplash


Let's start with some of Kashmir's most popular street foods:

  • 1. Barbequed Mutton (Seekh Tujj): As one of the most popular street foods, Tujj is a skewered mixture of minced lamb roasted over a hot red ember. There are a variety of chutneys and a native Kashmiri bread called Lavasa with which Seekh Tujj can be eaten. Khayam Chowk is a bustling marketplace where you may enjoy this year-round cuisine.


Barbeque on charcoal Tujj is a skewered mixture of minced lamb roasted over a hot red ember. Photo by Habib Dadkhah on Unsplash


  • 2.Chickpea Wrap (Masala Tchot): Chickpeas and radish chutney are the main ingredients of this wrap and it sometimes is filled with curd and green chilies wrapped in a soft Kashmiri bread called Lavasa.

A vendor selling chickpea wraps. Chickpeas and radish chutney are wrapped in Lavasa. Photo by Mahyah Binti Idris


  • 3.Fried peas (Tillae Karrae): As a popular street dish in Kashmir, Tilli Karre is a must-try. These are made from chickpeas or dried green peas, which are coated in a batter of flour and deep fried in hot oil till dark orange.

  • 4. Fried lotus stem (Nader Monje): Rice or gram flour is used to coat lotus stems, which are then deep fried in oil. It is served with chutney prepared by mixing sliced onion with red chili powder.

Fried peas, fried lotus stem and fried fish batter at Hazrat Bal, Srinagar The crispy Gaad Monje can be substituted for the Nadir Monje for those who enjoy non-vegetarian food. Photo By Mahyah Binti Idris.


  • 5.Fried fish in batter (Gaad Monje): The crispy Gaad Monje can be substituted for the Nadir Monje for those who enjoy non-vegetarian food. It's a classic fried snack, and its plus point is that it doesn't have the normal fishy smell.
  • 6.Deep fried Poori with Halwa (Tobruk Halvah parantha): With the semolina (sooji) halwa, you'll have a unique flour parantha typically with a diameter of 3 feet. The preparation of enormous paranthas may be seen outside nearly every shrine. As many as three to four individuals can comfortably consume one parantha with halwa. To enhance its flavor of the Halwa, it is garnished with dried fruits, coconut pieces, and finely chopped Tutti Frutti.

As many as three to four individuals can comfortably consume one parantha with halwa. To enhance its flavor of the Halwa, it is garnished with dried fruits, coconut pieces, and finely chopped Tutti Frutti. Photo By Mahyah Binti Idris.


Aside from all of those mentioned above, additional popular street food specialties include Peanuts (Chilgozay), Roasted Corn (Makai Waet), Golgappay/ Pani Puri, Khande Gazir, Besrakh, Kruhun Masale, Ginger Tea (Adrakh Wali Chai).


Keywords: Street food, Kashmir Valley, Golgappa, Chai, Masala, fried fish.


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