Tuesday January 21, 2020

Stress Cardiac MRI can Predict Fatal Heart Disease: Study

Researchers analysed data from more than 9,000 patients who underwent CMR.

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Heart disease, Neurological
For the study, published in journal "Annals of Neurology", the team of researchers searched genetic datasets of around 25 million people to find risk factors for developing ALS. Pixabay

A novel method called stress cardiac MRI can not only diagnose heart disease, but can also predict which cases are potentially fatal, suggests a new research.

The study showed that predicting mortality is a key requirement for the technology to be more widely used.

In addition, results suggest cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) has the potential to be a non-invasive, non-toxic alternative to stress echocardiograms, catheterisations and stress nuclear exams in identifying the severity of the coronary artery disease.

“We’ve known for some time that CMR is effective at diagnosing coronary artery disease, but it’s still not commonly used and represents less than one per cent of stress tests used in this country,” said senior author Robert Judd, co-director of the Duke Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Center in the US.

cardiac, heart
CMR is effective at diagnosing coronary artery disease. Pixabay

For the study, researchers analysed data from more than 9,000 patients who underwent CMR.

The findings, published in JAMA Cardiology, showed that for patients without any history of heart disease and at low-risk based on traditional clinical criteria, those with an abnormal CMR scan were 3.4 times more likely to die compared to patients with a normal CMR scan.

For the entire patient population, there was a strong association between an abnormal stress CMR and mortality, even after adjusting for patient age, sex and cardiac risk factors, the team found.

While non-invasive cardiac stress testing is a cornerstone in the clinical management of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease, CMR works as well or better than other exams at identifying heart wall motion, cell death and the presence of low blood flow, said the study.

Cardiovascular Disease
stress cardiac MRI can not only diagnose heart disease, but can also predict which cases are potentially fatal. Pixabay

Furthermore, the technology does not require any radiation exposure, which is essential in nuclear stress tests.

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“With the findings from this study suggesting that stress CMR is effective in predicting mortality, we provide a strong basis for a head-to-head study between stress CMR and other modalities,” Judd noted. (IANS)

Next Story

Women More Likely to Die Because of Heart Failure Than Men, Says Study

Men and women have different biologies and this results in different types of the same heart diseases

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Heart Failure
The researchers explain that many of the differences between woman and men when it comes to heart Failure are connected to the sex hormone, oestrogen. Pixabay

Researchers have found that more women than men die of heart failure and 50 per cent of the heart failure cases among women are caused by having a heart attack, which can be treated with modern methods.

According to the study, 50 per cent of women experiencing heart failure and the cause is generally related to having untreated high blood pressure levels over time, which leads to progressive stiffening of the heart. There is no effective treatment for this kind of heart failure yet, the study published in the journal Nature Medicine.

“Men and women have different biologies and this results in different types of the same heart diseases. It is about time to recognise these differences,” said study researcher Eva Gerdts from University of Bergen in Norway.

For the study, the researchers have compared common risk factors for heart diseases and how these affect men and women differently. They have, among other things, focused on the sex differences in the effect of obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes.

According to The World Health Organization (WHO), 11 per cent women and 15 per cent men are obese (BMI over 30 kg/ m2) globally. In Norway, one in five adults are obese.

“If we see this from a life span perspective, we can see that obesity increases with age, and that this trend is greater for women than men. Obesity increases the risk of having high blood pressure by a factor of three. This, in turn, increases the risk of heart disease,” Gerdts said.

According to the researchers, obesity also increases the risk of diabetes 2. A woman with diabetes has a much higher relative risk of heart complications and death than a man. “We know that women with diabetes 2 are usually obese and some of the fat is stored in the heart, which makes it more vulnerable for disease,” Gerdts added.

The researchers explain that many of the differences between woman and men when it comes to heart disease are connected to the sex hormone, oestrogen. The hormone prevents the formation of connective tissue in the heart, which makes it harder for the heart to pump blood. In men the effects are just the opposite.

Heart Failure
Researchers have found that more women than men die of heart failure and 50 per cent of the heart failure cases among women are caused by having a heart attack, which can be treated with modern methods. Pixabay

“We see that obese men store oestrogen in their fat cells in the abdomen, which has a bad effect on the heart,” Gerdts said. After menopause, women lose the oestrogen advantage. Their arteries become stiffer and more vulnerable for diseases, the study said.

“We think that this is part of the explanation for why high blood pressure seems to indicate higher risk of heart disease amongst women,” Gerdts said. In addition, smoking is also a part of the risk scenario for women.

ALSO READ: Cancer Drugs Can Be Used To Treat Pulmonary Diseases: Study

“For women, the effects of risk factors such as smoking, obesity and high blood pressure increase after menopause,” Gerdts concluded. (IANS)