Monday November 19, 2018

Strong Relationships May Counter Health Effects of Childhood Abuses

"We were curious as to whether social support during this 'incubation' period or interim could offset health risks associated with much earlier experiences of abuse,"

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Childhood abuses have been linked with many serious health consequences in adulthood including premature mortality, heart disease, stroke and some cancers. Pexels
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A strong and supportive relationship in midlife may act as a buffer against the poor health outcomes as well as premature mortality risk in adulthood for the victims of childhood abuses, researchers have claimed.

Childhood abuses have been linked with many serious health consequences in adulthood including premature mortality, heart disease, stroke and some cancers.

But, a social support was found to lower mortality risk by 19 to 26 percent depending on whether it was a severe physical abuse, moderate physical abuse or emotional abuse.

ALSO READ: One out of Two Children face Child Sexual Abuse: The Growing Problem of Child Sexual Abuse in India

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Social support was also associated with a more modest seven to eight percent lower mortality risk in those who suffered minimally or had no exposure to abuse, the researcher said. Pixabay

 

“The study provides evidence suggesting that experiences long after exposure to abuse can mitigate the mortality risks associated with early abuse,” said post-doctoral student Jessica Chiang, from Northwestern University in the US.

For the study, published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour, the researchers included 6,000 US adults and examined whether adult social support decreased mortality risk associated with exposure to three types of childhood abuse: severe physical abuse, modest physical abuse, and emotional abuse.

ALSO READ: Adults who experienced Abuse and Neglect in Childhood are less likely to own Home at 50, says a new Research

childhood abuses
“Many of the diseases associated with childhood abuse typically emerge in middle and later stages of adulthood — decades after the abuse actually occurred,” Chiang said. Pixabay

 

“We were curious as to whether social support during this ‘incubation’ period or interim could offset health risks associated with much earlier experiences of abuse,” she added.

The results showed the magnitude of the reduction in mortality risk associated with midlife social support differed between the individuals who reported childhood abuse and those who reported minimal or no childhood abuse. (IANS)

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One out of Two Children face Child Sexual Abuse: The Growing Problem of Child Sexual Abuse in India

A recent survey by World Vision India reveals that 50% children have faced sexual abuse in India

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  • One out of two children in India face child sexual abuse.
  • The perpetrators of sexual abuse among children are often close to them and trusted by the family.
  • The children from economically backward families are often trafficked and abused.
  • Information, awareness and communication are important tools for handling sexual abuse among children.

Child sexual abuse and child trafficking are rapidly festering problems in India, as a recent survey by World Vision India reveals that out of 45,844 children interviewed, almost half of them have been subjected to sexual abuse. The alarming statistics which indicate the unsafe circumstances faced by children also pose a glaring question: how do we know when a child has been abused?

Child sexual abuse is one of the least addressed issues in India, because of the taboo and the social stigma associated with it. Most children who have been abused refuse to disclose their discomfort out of shame and fear of punishment, as in most cases, the perpetrators of the child sexual abuse are persons who are explicitly trusted by the family. According to a survey conducted by the Government of India in 2007, the sexual abuse of children occurs mostly between the ages of 5 and 12, when they are unable to articulate their pain, as they lack the basic training to discriminate between affection and abuse.

Children engaged in labour are often trafickked and sexually abused.
Stock images, Wikipedia

Child trafficking in India

The problem of child sexual abuse in India among children is further intensified by the issue of child trafficking, as many economically backward families with multiple children often engage their children in labour, in an effort to earn their daily subsistence. The children employed in illegal labour are often trafficked away from their homes and even outside the country, where they become victims of child sexual abuse. The education system in India, which is often inaccessible to the children of the underdeveloped sections of the society, also become victims of child trafficking, as they lack the awareness and the information which might protect them from child sexual abuse.

Children engaged in labour are often trafickked and sexually abused
Stock image, Wikipedia

How to combat child sexual abuse

The main weapons in the battle against sexual abuse among children are communication and awareness. Once children learn to identify potential sexual predators, necessary steps may be adopted to ensure their safety and security. The development of a ‘safe space’ for children, where they may confide in adults without the fear of judgement or persecution might encourage them to disclose their concerns, which might help in the identification of potential threats which may hamper their well being.

“Despite one in every two children being a victim of child sexual abuse, there continues to be a huge silence. The magnitude of sexual violence against children is unknown,” states Cherian Thomas, the Director of World Vision India, claiming that one out of four families do not lodge complaints regarding cases of child sexual abuse. The unwillingness to engage in conversations regarding the growing menace of sexual abuse and trafficking among children also pose a major problem while combating with issues that threaten the safety of children. “I feel it is time that we all come under one banner and umbrella to focus our work around child protection,” said Cherian, encouraging parent-child conversation regarding sexual violence, as a measure to combat the prevalence of such crimes.