Friday April 26, 2019

Strong Relationships May Counter Health Effects of Childhood Abuses

"We were curious as to whether social support during this 'incubation' period or interim could offset health risks associated with much earlier experiences of abuse,"

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children abuses
Childhood abuses have been linked with many serious health consequences in adulthood including premature mortality, heart disease, stroke and some cancers. Pexels

A strong and supportive relationship in midlife may act as a buffer against the poor health outcomes as well as premature mortality risk in adulthood for the victims of childhood abuses, researchers have claimed.

Childhood abuses have been linked with many serious health consequences in adulthood including premature mortality, heart disease, stroke and some cancers.

But, a social support was found to lower mortality risk by 19 to 26 percent depending on whether it was a severe physical abuse, moderate physical abuse or emotional abuse.

ALSO READ: One out of Two Children face Child Sexual Abuse: The Growing Problem of Child Sexual Abuse in India

child abuse
Social support was also associated with a more modest seven to eight percent lower mortality risk in those who suffered minimally or had no exposure to abuse, the researcher said. Pixabay

 

“The study provides evidence suggesting that experiences long after exposure to abuse can mitigate the mortality risks associated with early abuse,” said post-doctoral student Jessica Chiang, from Northwestern University in the US.

For the study, published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour, the researchers included 6,000 US adults and examined whether adult social support decreased mortality risk associated with exposure to three types of childhood abuse: severe physical abuse, modest physical abuse, and emotional abuse.

ALSO READ: Adults who experienced Abuse and Neglect in Childhood are less likely to own Home at 50, says a new Research

childhood abuses
“Many of the diseases associated with childhood abuse typically emerge in middle and later stages of adulthood — decades after the abuse actually occurred,” Chiang said. Pixabay

 

“We were curious as to whether social support during this ‘incubation’ period or interim could offset health risks associated with much earlier experiences of abuse,” she added.

The results showed the magnitude of the reduction in mortality risk associated with midlife social support differed between the individuals who reported childhood abuse and those who reported minimal or no childhood abuse. (IANS)

Next Story

Childhood Maltreatment Strongest Risk Factor for Depression in Adulthood: Lancet

The findings are to develop or improve risk-adapted interventions for people susceptible to a worse long-term clinical outcome

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depression
Fourteen had a remission period of less than two months and could therefore be regarded as having chronic depression. Pixabay

Facing trauma in childhood can significantly change the structure of the brain, which may result in severe depression which could even be recurrent in adulthood, say researchers.

The results from MRI scan images suggest that both childhood maltreatment and recurring depression are associated with similar reductions in the surface area of the insular cortex, part of the brain that regulates emotion and self-awareness.

This reduction in the brain could make a future relapse more likely, said the study, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal, which found childhood maltreatment one of the strongest risk factors for major depression in adulthood.

depression
Depression is among the leading causes of disability in the U.S. and is being closely monitored by health authorities amid rising suicides nationwide. Pixabay

“Given the impact of the insular cortex on brain functions such as emotional awareness, it’s possible that the changes we saw make patients less responsive to conventional treatments,” said lead researcher Nils Opel from the University of Munster in Germany.

The study included 110 patients aged 18 to 60 years. Of the 75 patients who experienced a relapse, 48 had experienced one additional episode, seven reported two episodes, and six experienced three episodes.

Fourteen had a remission period of less than two months and could therefore be regarded as having chronic depression.

depression
This reduction in the brain could make a future relapse more likely, said the study, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal. Pixabay

ALSO READ: 4 Indian-American Teenagers Awarded for Inventions in Environmental Issues

The findings are to develop or improve risk-adapted interventions for people susceptible to a worse long-term clinical outcome.

Future psychiatric research should therefore explore how the findings could be translated into special attention, care and treatment that could improve patient outcomes, the study noted. (IANS)