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Stronger Encryption is The Best Way to Prevent Cyber Attacks, say Apple

Apple and the US Federal Bureau of Investigation engaged in a showdown in 2016 over the iPhone used by an assailant in the San Bernardino terror attack

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Apple
Top apps using Siri Shortcuts to make daily tasks easier: Apple. Pixabay

Countering a common argument that strong encryption may come in the way of well-meaning investigation of criminal activities, Apple has stressed that stronger — not weaker — encryption is the best way to protect against threats of cyber attacks and terrorism.

In a letter to the Australian government, the Cupertino, California-headquartered tech giant asserted that encryption was in fact a benefit and public good, The Verge reported on Friday.

Apple was specifically responding to a bill designed to five government easy access to the devices and data of criminals during investigations.

The tech giant said it takes technology’s role in protecting national security and citizens’s lives extremely seriously.

“Every day, over a trillion transactions occur safely over the internet as a result of encrypted communications,” Apple said in its letter while responding to the Australian Parliament’s Assistance and Access Bill.

Apple
An Apple store in Woodbridge, Virginia. (VOA)

“Criminals and terrorists who want to infiltrate systems and disrupt sensitive networks may start their attacks by accessing just one person’s smartphone. In the face of these threats, this is no time to weaken encryption.”

While Apple was not outright condemning the bill, it, however, attempted to make the case that “the draft legislation remains dangerously ambiguous with respect to encryption and security” The Verge report added.

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Apple and the US Federal Bureau of Investigation engaged in a showdown in 2016 over the iPhone used by an assailant in the San Bernardino terror attack.

The FBI had to seek third-party help after Apple refused to assist the investigating agency unlock the phone. (IANS)

Next Story

Upcoming Apple iPhone May Have Qualcomm Ultrasonic Fingerprint Sensor

Apple might be using OLED displays from Samsung that are thinner than the displays currently being used

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Apple
As per the report, Apple may use Qualcomm's X55 modems in all its 2020 iPhones, which support both mmWave and sub-6GHz spectrum. Pixabay

Apple is reportedly planing to use Qualcomm’s ultrasonic fingerprint sensor technology in one iPhone model, set to be released in 2020.

The iPhone maker was partnering with Taiwanese touchscreen maker GIS to develop an iPhone for 2020 or 2021 that could use the under-display tech, MacRumors reported on Wednesday.

Qualcomm unveiled the new 3D Sonic Max ultrasonic fingerprint reader on Tuesday at its third annual Snapdragon Technology Summit.

Qualcomm supplies ultrasonic fingerprint sensors for Samsung’s Galaxy S10 and Galaxy Note10 smartphones. But iPhones could use an even more advanced version of the technology by 2020 or 2021 rolls in.

J.P. Morgan analyst Samik Chatterjee believes, Apple will release a 5.4-inch iPhone, two 6.1-inch iPhones and one 6.7-inch iPhone with 5G connectivity in 2020.

Chatterjee predicts the company may introduce two high-end models (one 6.1-inch and one 6.7-inch) with support for mmWave, as well as a triple-lens camera and “world facing” 3D sensing for improved augmented reality capabilities.

Apple
Apple is reportedly planing to use Qualcomm’s ultrasonic fingerprint sensor technology in one iPhone model, set to be released in 2020. Pixabay

While, two low-end models (6.1-inch, 5.4-inch) will not have mmWave or World facing 3D sensing, and will have a dual-lens camera.

As per the report, Apple may use Qualcomm’s X55 modems in all its 2020 iPhones, which support both mmWave and sub-6GHz spectrum.

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All four iPhone models will have OLEDs. Apple might be using OLED displays from Samsung that are thinner than the displays currently being used. (IANS)