Thursday July 18, 2019
Home Lead Story Students Want...

Students Want Interactive Teachers to Keep Them off Technology

But a majority of the instructors feel that banning technology in class is not an answer

0
//
US Classroom
FILE - Fifth grader Ashlynn De Filippis, left, solves math problems on the DreamBox system as teacher Heather Dalton, center rear, works with other students in class at Charles Barnum Elementary School in Groton, Connecticut, Sept. 20, 2018.
Students feel it is the professors’ responsibility to ensure they do not surf the web or use social media in classrooms, a study suggests.
For the study, published in the Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, researchers surveyed 478 undergraduates and 36 instructors on their perception of technology use in class.
“While students felt that it was their choice to use the technology, they saw it as the instructors’ responsibility to motivate them not to use it,” said Elena Neiterman, Professor at the University of Waterloo in Canada.
“Some students said that instructors need to be more entertaining to keep students engaged in the classroom, but this is a big task, given that we are not employed in the entertainment industry,” she said.
Internet
FILE – Students surf the internet in their dorm room at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn., April 24. (VOA)
Nine per cent of the students found course materials on other’s laptop as distracting while 49 per cent found non-course materials on others screens were distracting them.
During the study, instructors saw technology as useful for providing accessible education, but it was also distracting for them – 68 per cent were bothered by the use of phones in the classroom.
Only 32 per cent were bothered by the use of laptops and tablets, probably because they assume that laptops and tablets are used by students for class work.
Some instructors also reported that off-task technology not only affected student learning but also hindered their own ability to teach effectively.
But a majority of the instructors feel that banning technology in class is not an answer. (IANS)

Next Story

Petting Dogs, Cats Can Improve Students’ Mood: Study

These results were found even while considering that some students may have had very high or low levels to begin with

0
The results showed that the pups' attractiveness was lowest at birth and increased to a maximum before 10 weeks of age before declining and then levelling off.
Representational Image. pixabay

College is stressful. Students have classes, exams and so many other pressures common in modern life and now researchers have found that petting dogs and cats can improve students’ mood with stress-relieving physiological benefits, a study shows.

According to the study published in the journal AERA Open, many universities have instituted “Pet Your Stress Away” programmes, where students can come in and interact with cats and dogs.

“Just 10 minutes can have a significant impact,” students in our study that interacted with cats and dogs had a significant reduction in cortisol, a major stress hormone,” said Patricia Pendry, Associate Professor at Washington State University.

The study involved 249 college students randomly divided into four groups. The first group received hands-on interaction in small groups with cats and dogs for 10 minutes. They could pet, play with and generally hang out with the animals as they wanted.

To compare effects of different exposures to animals, the second group observed other people petting animals while they waited in line for their turn. The third group watched a slideshow of the same animals available during the intervention, while the fourth group was “waitlisted”.

“Relations with pets tend to be less complicated than those with humans, and pets are often a source of great enjoyment. They also provide older people with a sense of being needed and loved,” said Mary Janevic, researcher at the University of Michigan in the US.  Pixabay

According to the researchers, those students waited for their turn quietly for 10 minutes without their phones, reading materials or other stimuli, but were told they would experience animal interaction soon.

For the findings, several salivary cortisol samples were collected from each participant, starting in the morning when they woke up.

Once all the data was crunched from the various samples, the students who interacted directly with the pets showed significantly less cortisol in their saliva after the interaction.

Also Read: Truecaller Announces Global Launch of its Software Development Kit for Mobile Web

These results were found even while considering that some students may have had very high or low levels to begin with.

“What we wanted to learn was whether this exposure would help students reduce their stress in a less subjective way. And it did, which is exciting because the reduction of stress hormones may, over time, have significant benefits for physical and mental health,” Pendry said. (IANS)