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EXCLUSIVE: Vishwanath Sanskrit Vidyalaya in Delhi is trying to keep the Cultural Roots Alive in Students through Sanskrit Language

What makes this Sanskrit School different from others?

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Chintamanni Vedpathi with students
Chintamanni Vedpathi with students. Youtube
  • Vishwanath Sanskrit Vidyalaya  is one of the oldest Sanskrit Institutions in Delhi
  • Students wear white dhoti and shirt, they greet their guru or teacher by clasping their hands together
  • The Sri Vishwanath Sanyas Ashram takes care of the student’s  food by providing them with free food and they also stay in hostel free of cost  

New Delhi, August 30, 2017: There is a school in Delhi away from the overdose of technology and westernization. This school is trying to strengthen the roots of Indian culture by giving the gyan (knowledge) of Sanskrit to their students.

Reporter Kritika Dua got in touch with the teachers of Vishwanath Sanskrit Vidyalaya– Jai Prakash Mishra and Rajendra Sharma to know what is so special about this Delhi-based School. To get the taste of the pattern that this school follows, she spoke with students- Virender Tiwari and Pushpendra Chaturvedi who shared some interesting anecdotes about the school.

This Sanskrit Vidyalaya is one of the oldest Sanskrit Institutions in Delhi, where classes begin at 11 am and end at 4.10 p.m. The school has produced many Sanskrit scholars in the past and it is run by Sri Vishwanath Sanyas Ashram, which is located just opposite to the school.

On entering the classroom, you can see students wearing white dhoti and shirt, students greet their guru or teacher by clasping their hands together and sit on the carpeted floor while learning at the Vidyalaya.

One of the teachers at this school, Jai Prakash Mishra said, “around 55-60 students stay in the hostel, rest of them come from other areas in Delhi to study here. The ones who stay in hostel come from different states like Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, and Rajasthan.”

Entrance of Vishwanath Sanskrit Vidyalaya, Delhi.
Entrance of Vishwanath Sanskrit Vidyalaya, Delhi

Students having interest in learning the ancient language of India are welcome in this school, no matter which part of the country they belong to. The only requirement is to be a good shisya (pupil) – he should be serious towards education, ready to lead a disciplined life and should be hard-working.

Mishra added, “the Sri Vishwanath Sanyas Ashram takes care of the student’s  food by providing them with free food and they also stay in hostel free of cost.” There are 10 teachers currently in this school.

Volleyball Court in School Playground
Volleyball Court in School Playground

The students play Volleyball and Cricket in the school playground though there is no sports teacher in the school. Rajendra Sharma, Hindi teacher said, “The students here can get the education -9th class and 10th class called purva madhyama, 11th and 12th called uttar madhyama, till graduation called Shastri though they get a post-graduation degree from the school. The degree they get is from Sampurnanand Sanskrit Vishwavidyalaya (SSVV), Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh as the school is affiliated with this university.”

The School teaches other subjects apart from Sanskrit like Hindi, history, science, English literature, English Grammar, law etc.  Sharma told about his expectations from the students, “Our students are preserving Indian Culture by learning Sanskrit. I wish that they have a bright future ahead.”

ALSO READ: Move to Make Sanskrit Classes Mandatory Raises Ruckus in Assam

The students of this all boy’s school have short cropped hair which is sometimes shaven heads with tufts of hair at the back. They are rooted in Indian culture which can be seen through their behavior, good manners, dressing and talking sense.

Rahul Shukla, a 9th class student said that he can recite shlokas perfectly and wants to be a Shastri when he grows up. Vishwanath Sanskrit Vidyalaya has branches in Haridwar, Varanasi, Shimla, Kolkata, Mount Abu, and Bikaner.

Virender Tiwari (19) is pursuing graduation from this school and here the B.A first year course is called Shastriya Pratham, and he will become a Shastri after he completes his graduation. Tiwari said, “my experience has been extremely enriching in this school so far, all the knowledge I have of Sanskrit is because of what I have been taught here.”

Pushpendra Chaturvedi completed his graduation last year, now he lives in Dilshad Garden and is a priest in a temple. Pushpendra said, “I came to this school in the 9th standard, this school did a lot for me and I have fond memories of this place. I want to pursue B.ED and become a Sanskrit teacher.”

He talked about the ex-principal of the school, Ram Sarmukh Dwivedi, 95 years old Mahatma. He was a Sanskrit  Scholar and had in depth knowledge of Sanskrit language, literature, and ‘Ved Puran’. The current Principal of this unique Sanskrit school is Dr. Brahmachari Balram.


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India: Students From Small Towns Now Prefer Courses in Cybersecurity, Professional Gaming

In an era where global economies are being driven by technology, India is no different

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India, Students, Cybersecurity
Courses are now increasingly being replaced by the likes of cybersecurity, professional gaming and different computer languages. PIxabay

Gone are the days when students in small towns planned to pursue traditional courses like calligraphy art or swimming during their annual summer breaks. These course are now increasingly being replaced by the likes of cybersecurity, professional gaming and different computer languages.

While some of them are learning these courses to quench curiosity, others have high ambitions and often look up to India-born CEOs of top companies like Google’s Sundar Pichai, Microsoft’s Satya Nadella and Adobe’s Shantanu Narayen as their role models.

“Why do I need to learn how to write calligraphy? Would I ever even use it? I am opting in for computer language courses that I could actually put to use if in case, I plan to develop the best game in the world tomorrow,” said Nityam Jain, a class 12th student from Jabalpur in Madhya Pradesh as he filled out a summer-course form to learn the basics of computer coding during his vacations.

According to Rajneet Jain, Director, Gyan Ganga Group of Institutions in Jabalpur, children these days are opting to spend more “productive” time in front of screens rather than out in the sun.

India, Students, Cybersecurity
Gone are the days when students in small towns planned to pursue traditional courses like calligraphy art or swimming . Pixabay

“Apart from our engineering students, high-school kids as well as MBA and pharmacy aspirants often choose to attend professional tech-oriented workshops that would teach them something new about computers, smartphones, apps or the Internet,” Jain said.

“In an era where global economies are being driven by technology, India is no different. Due to rapid proliferation of the Internet, young Indians, especially from smaller cities, are relying heavily on digital technologies to help them put their best foot forward,” Nikhil Arora, Vice President and Managing Director, GoDaddy India told IANS.

In May, Apple CEO Tim Cook had said that a four-year degree is not necessary to excel at coding. Cook believes that, “if we can get coding in the early grades and have a progression of difficulty over the tenure of somebody’s high school years, by the time kids graduate they are already writing apps that could be put on the App Store”.

Every year, during its World Wide Developer’s Conference (WWDC) event, tech-giant Apple hosts students from around the world to encourage the next generation of developers.

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This year, 14 Indian students made it to the event to showcase their advanced-tech marvels as apps, games and more. All of these young achievers started their tech-journeys at very early ages.

WWDC attendee Swapnanil Dhole — a college student from Ahmedabad, Gujarat — said he had begun coding from age 8 and today, he already has two apps on App Store called AeroNautical and Tap2WiFi.

Recognising the potential, several tech giants including Facebook and Microsoft are focusing on designing India-specific programmes across fields like agritech, edutech, gaming and software development verticals to help kids in small cities get access to metro-level infrastructure and learnings from experts who are willing to mentor and give back to the community.

India, Students, Cybersecurity
While some of them are learning these courses to quench curiosity, others have high ambitions and often look up to India-born CEOs of top companies. Pixabay

“Learning no longer depends on the place you belong to. Find good mentors who can teach you on how to walk on ethical path to fulfil your goal. I was lucky to find many good mentors in Jabalpur who helped to realise what I really want to do and what I’m really capable of,” said Nitesh Kumar Jangir who won the “2019 Commonwealth Secretary-General’s Innovation for Sustainable Development Award” in London this month.

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“If kids get interested in technologies like computer coding and cybersecurity at early ages, by the time they reach their late teens or early twenties, they would already have an understanding of advanced technologies like Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Blockchain and Internet of Things,” IT professional Tirupati Bonangi told IANS. (IANS)