Wednesday August 22, 2018

Study: Dementia Risk to 50-year-olds With Raised Blood Pressure

How middle-age hypertension raises dementia risk later

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Higher BMI may increase your BP as well. Pixabay
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A high blood pressure level but still below the usual threshold for treating hypertension can put 50-year-olds at increased risk of developing dementia later, revealed a study led by an Indian-origin researcher.

According to the American Heart Association, normal blood pressure is below 120/80 mmHg.

People with a systolic blood pressure (the top number) of 130 mmHg or more at the age of 50 had a 45 per cent greater risk of developing dementia than those with a lower level at the same age.

The risk was 47 per cent even in people with no heart or blood vessel-related conditions.

“Our work confirms the detrimental effects of midlife hypertension for risk of dementia,” said lead author Archana Singh-Manoux, Professor at the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM) in Paris.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

The reason for the increased risk of dementia includes the fact that high blood pressure is linked to silent or mini strokes (where symptoms often are not noticeable), damage to the white matter in the brain, which contains many of the brain’s nerve fibres, and restricted blood supply to the brain.

This damage may underlie the resulting decline in the brain’s processes, the researchers explained in the study of nearly 9,000 people, published in the European Heart Journal.

However, the association was not seen at the ages of 60 and 70, and diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) was not linked to dementia.

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“Our analysis suggests that the importance of mid-life hypertension on brain health is due to the duration of exposure,” the researcher said.

“So we see an increased risk for people with raised blood pressure at age 50, but not 60 or 70, because those with hypertension at age 50 are likely to be ‘exposed’ to this risk for longer,” she added.

Another study reported in the journal Cardiovascular Research showed that higher risk of developing dementia in hypertensive patients occurs due to significant alterations in three specific white matter fibre-tracts linked to executive functions, processing speed, memory and related learning tasks — brain areas associated with dementia. (IANS)

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Microsoft Planning for Next version of Smart Glasses in Order to Monitor Blood Pressure

The aim is to shrink the device to such an extent that it could become a clip-on that works with anyone's regular glasses, the report added

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Microsoft developing next version of BP-monitoring smart glasses. Pixabay

Microsoft is developing the next version of its smart glasses, called Glabella, that can work as a cuff-less, wearable and unobtrusive blood pressure measuring device, according to a new report.

The device incorporates optical sensors, processing, storage, and communication components, all integrated into the frame to passively collect physiological data about the user without the need for any interaction, according to a paper published on Proceedings of the ACM Journal of Interactive, Mobile, Wearable and Ubiquitous Technologies.

Glabella continuously records the stream of reflected light intensities from blood flow as well as inertial measurements of the user’s head.

From the temporal differences in pulse events across the sensors, this prototype derives the wearer’s pulse transit time on a beat-to-beat basis.

Microsoft
Logo of Microsoft outside it’s office. Pixabay

A person’s pulse transit time — the time delay following each heartbeat as the pressure wave travels between two arterial sites — provides an indirect measure of blood pressure, according to a report in IEEE Spectrum.

 Although the glasses did well in a test run, they are not yet ready to hit the store shelves as the Microsoft researchers plan to evaluate the Glabella glasses in a clinical setting.

The team is also developing a next version of the device to make it more power efficient while making the frame smaller, the report added.

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Currently, a small chargeable coin battery keeps the device running.

The aim is to shrink the device to such an extent that it could become a clip-on that works with anyone’s regular glasses, the report added. (IANS)