Sunday January 20, 2019

Study: Sleeping For 7 Hours to Keep Your Heart Younger

Sleep duration coupled with excess heart age may prove helpful for communicating the cardiovascular risks and benefits associated with sleep duration

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Less than 6 hours of sleep linked to hardened arteries Pixabay

Sleeping for seven hours a day may reduce the age of your heart as well as decrease the risks for cardiovascular disease, say researchers.

The study showed that excess heart age is the lowest in adults who sleep seven hours a night.

Sleeping times less than or greater than seven hours were associated with increased excess heart age, while short sleepers had the highest elevations in excess heart age.

Sleep duration coupled with excess heart age may prove helpful for communicating the cardiovascular risks and benefits associated with sleep duration.

“These results are important because they demonstrate a quantitative method for the inclusion of sleep duration in the establishment and communication of cardiovascular risk for individuals,” said Julia Durmer from the Emory University in Georgia, US.

The study, published in the journal Sleep, included data from 12,775 adults aged between 30-74 years.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

They self reported their sleep duration which was classified into five categories — five hours or less, six, seven, eight, nine and/or more hours of sleep.

The team used sex-specific Framingham heart age algorithm to calculate each individual’s heart age and used multivariable linear or logistic regression to examine the association between sleep duration and excess heart age.

The results showed that mean adjusted excess heart age was lowest among adults who reported sleeping seven hours per 24-hour period.

Also Read: Healthy Sleep Key to Ward off Depression Later

“This could have utility in the clinical care of patients with cardiovascular risk, and for public health researchers interested in adding a sleep metric to future studies,” Durmer said.

According to the US-based National Sleep Foundation, people who do not sleep enough are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease-regardless of age, weight, smoking and exercise habits.

Sleeping too little causes disruptions in underlying health conditions and biological processes like glucose metabolism, blood pressure and inflammation. However, the same may hold true for over sleeping. (IANS)

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Sleeping for Long Hours During Pregnancy Linked to Stillbirths

Progress in reducing stillbirth deaths has been slow but stillbirth is an urgent global health issue that should be at the centre of more research programmes, the researchers noted

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Pregnancy, air pollution
Sleeping for long hours during pregnancy linked to stillbirths. Pixabay

Sleeping more than nine hours per night during pregnancy may be associated with late stillbirth, suggests a new study.

This is because blood pressure reaches its lowest point during sleep which has been linked with foetal growth problems, preterm birth, and stillbirth.

The study, led by a team from the University of Michigan, explored how maternal sleep habits, including lengthy periods of sleep without waking more than once in the night, may be associated with foetal health independent of other risk factors.

Moreover, pregnant women often report waking up and getting up in the middle of the night.

Very disruptive sleep has also been associated with poor pregnancy outcomes, including growth restriction and preterm growth.

Protein responsible for postpartum depression in pregnancy found
Representational image. IANS

“Our findings add to research indicating that maternal sleep plays a role in foetal well being. Studies aiming to reduce stillbirths should consider maternal sleep as this is a potentially modifiable risk factor,” said lead author Louise O’Brien, researcher at the varsity.

“Understanding the role of maternal sleep may help us identify interventions that would put us in a better position to advise women,” O’Brien added.

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For the study, reported in the journal Birth, the team involved 153 women who had experienced a late stillbirth (on or after 28 weeks of pregnancy) within the previous month and 480 women with an ongoing third-trimester pregnancy or who had recently delivered a live born baby during the same period.

Progress in reducing stillbirth deaths has been slow but stillbirth is an urgent global health issue that should be at the centre of more research programmes, the researchers noted. (IANS)