Sunday September 22, 2019

Study: Smoking During Pregnancy can Cause Hearing Loss in Baby

Children who were exposed to tobacco smoke during pregnancy and second-hand smoke at 4 months had a 2.4 times increased relative risk

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Pregnancy, air pollution
Sleeping for long hours during pregnancy linked to stillbirths. Pixabay

If you are planning to start motherhood, quit smoking, say researchers. Exposing your baby to tobacco smoke during pregnancy or after the birth may cause hearing impairment in them.

According to the researchers, babies who were exposed to smoking during pregnancy had a 68 per cent increased relative risk of developing hearing problems.

“This study clearly shows that preventing exposure to tobacco smoke during pregnancy and postnatally may reduce the risk of hearing problems in children,” said Koji Kawakami from the Kyoto University in Japan.

The study, published in the journal Pediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, included data from 50,734 children aged 3 years.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

Out of the group, 3.8 per cent were exposed to smoking only during pregnancy, 3.9 per cent were exposed only to second-hand smoke at 4 months and 0.9 per cent were exposed to tobacco smoke during pregnancy and at 4 months.

The results showed that the prevalence of hearing impairment among babies aged three who were exposed to smoke was 4.6 per cent while those exposed to only second-hand smoke at 4 months had a 30 per cent increased relative risk.

Also Read: Research Shows Smoking Affects Leg Muscles

Children who were exposed to tobacco smoke during pregnancy and second-hand smoke at 4 months had a 2.4 times increased relative risk.

“The findings remind us of the need to continue strengthening interventions to prevent smoking before and during pregnancy and exposure to second-hand smoke in children,” Kawakami added. (IANS)

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Usage of E-cigarettes Doubled Among US Kids in Two Years

Researchers have found that the number of kids vaping nicotine in the US has doubled in the past two years

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e-cigarettes, nicotine, us, kids, smoking
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is pushing to enact a statewide ban on the sale of flavored e-cigarettes amid growing health concerns connected to vaping. Pixabay

Researchers have found that the number of kids vaping nicotine/ e-cigarettes in the US has doubled in the past two years.

Data from the 2019 Monitoring the Future Survey that included children in Classes 8, 10 and 12, shows alarmingly high rates of e-cigarette use compared to just a year ago, with rates doubling in the past two years, according to the study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

“Parents with school-aged children should begin paying close attention to these devices, which can look like simple flash drives, and frequently come in flavours that are appealing to youth,” said study lead researcher Richard Miech from the University of Michigan in the US.

“National leaders can assist parents by stepping up and implementing policies and programs to prevent use of these products by teens,” Miech said.

e-cigarettes, nicotine, us, kids, smoking
National leaders can assist parents by stepping up and implementing policies and programs to prevent use of these products by teens. Pixabay

The new data shows a significant increase in vaping of nicotine in the past month in each of the three grade levels since 2018.

In 2019, the prevalence of past month nicotine vaping was more than one in four students in Class 12, one in five in Class 10 and one in 11 in Class 8.

ALSO READ: Quit Alcohol For Improved Mental Health, Say Researchers

“With 25 per cent of 12th graders, 20 per cent of 10th graders and nine per cent of 8th graders now vaping nicotine within the past month, the use of these devices has become a public health crisis,” said Nora D. Volkow from National Institute on Drug Abuse in US.

“These products introduce the highly addictive chemical nicotine to these young people and their developing brains, and I fear we are only beginning to learn the possible health risks and outcomes for youth,” Volkow added. (IANS)