Monday December 10, 2018

Study Suggests Obese Children who Meet Milk Guidelines Have Less Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

Milk intake may cut metabolic syndrome risk in obese kids

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Study Suggests Obese Children who Meet Milk Guidelines Have Less Risk of Metabolic Syndrome
Study Suggests Obese Children who Meet Milk Guidelines Have Less Risk of Metabolic Syndrome. Pixabay
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Is your child obese? If so, drinking at least two servings of any type of cows’ milk each day are more likely to have lower fasting insulin, indicating better blood sugar control — risk factors for metabolic syndrome, according to a study.

Metabolic syndrome is defined as the presence of at least three of five conditions that increase the risk of diabetes, heart disease, and stroke–high blood pressure, high levels of blood sugar or triglycerides, excess belly fat, and low “good” cholesterol levels.

The results showed that children who drank less than one cup of milk each day had significantly higher levels of fasting insulin than those who drank less than or at least two cups a day.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

“Our findings indicate that obese children who consume at least the daily recommended amount of milk may have more favourable sugar handling and this could help guard against metabolic syndrome,” said Michael Yafi from the University of Texas Health Science Centre, US.

For the study, the team analysed 353 obese kids and adolescents aged three to 18 years and recorded information on daily milk intake, milk types, sugary drinks intake, fasting blood glucose, and insulin sensitivity.

The results presented at 2018 European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Austria, showed that kids who drank at least two cups of milk a day no association between milk intake and blood glucose or lipid levels.

Also Read: “Most obese people likely to stay fat” : Study

Another study, presented at the 2018 ECO, stated that dairy products had no link in the development of childhood obesity, as thought earlier.

According to the researchers, no evidence was found to suggest that body fatness varied by type of milk or dairy products, or with age of the children as opposed to the known belief. (IANS)

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Controlling Diet a Remedy For Metabolic Syndrome

More than 75 percent of the participants had too low dietary fibre intake, while 65 percent had too much salt

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Diet, weight may influence bipolar disorder treatment Flickr

For those suffering from metabolic syndrome, get your diet right; else you are at a greater risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

Adherence to dietary recommendations is weak among people suffering from metabolic syndrome or having increased risk for metabolic syndrome, said a new study.

“In most cases, the diet is too high in salt and saturated fat and too low in dietary fibre and unsaturated fat. Furthermore, several such people do not have a sufficient intake of vitamin D,” said the study led by the University of Eastern Finland.

The research took 175 people fulfilling at least two criteria for metabolic syndrome – for instance elevated blood pressure, elevated fasting plasma glucose concentration or abnormal blood lipid profile – and who were at least slightly overweight.

The researchers assessed the intake of nutrients for four days.

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The diet in over 80 percent of the participants was too high in saturated fat. Correspondingly, the intake of soft, polyunsaturated fat was sufficient only in one third of the participants.

More than 75 percent of the participants had too low dietary fibre intake, while 65 percent had too much salt.

Furthermore, the intake of vitamin D was insufficient among 20 percent of the participants, and one third of men and one fourth of women consumed too much alcohol, claimed the study published in the journal “Food and Nutrition Research”.

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Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of conditions – increased blood pressure, a high blood sugar level, excess body fat around the waist and abnormal cholesterol levels – that occur together, increasing your risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes.

Metabolic syndrome is becoming increasingly widespread, and it is associated with an elevated risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. From the viewpoint of the prevention of these diseases, adherence to dietary recommendations is of vital importance for those belonging to this risk group, the study said. (IANS)