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Study: Tablet Games May Offer Speech Therapy to Children

The results showed that tablets have a positive influence on social learning among children. While traditional therapy leans on instruction, the practitioners in the tablet therapy actively involved children and tried to motivate them

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According to researchers, games can also be used both in hospitals and in outpatient activities.
According to researchers, games can also be used both in hospitals and in outpatient activities. Pixabay
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If your child is unable to communicate effectively, then engaging him or her to tablet-based games is likely to act as a speech therapy and boost the kid’s motivation and satisfaction, according to a study.

According to researchers, games can also be used both in hospitals and in outpatient activities.

“Gadgets can be really helpful, and not merely entertainment devices. In speech therapy, more and more practical activities have been based on computer games lately. Kids can solve crosswords and puzzles, pronounce words that are difficult for them,” said Andreja Istenic Starcic from Kazan Federal University in Russia.

Previous studies comparing tablet-based and traditional math programmes showed that kids can become more involved in gamified tasks on tablets than in traditional textbook tasks.

Representational image.
Representational image. (IANS)

For the new study, published in the journal Behaviour and Information Technology, the team conducted case studies with a small number of children aged between 3-12, who manifested speech problems.

The results indicated that the use of tablet games for therapy purposes had a positive impact on children’s motivation and satisfaction.

Also Read: Piano Lessons Make Children Smarter, Claims New Study

“The results showed that tablets have a positive influence on social learning among children. While traditional therapy leans on instruction, the practitioners in the tablet therapy actively involved children and tried to motivate them,” Starcic said. (IANS)

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Scientists develop a mind-controlled Robotic hand that allows people with Quadriplegia to perform Everyday Tasks

The low-cost device was tested in Spain on six people with quadriplegia affecting their ability to grasp or manipulate objects

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In this undated grab taken from video, a patient uses a robotic hand to drink from a cup, in Badalona, Spain, VOA

Scientists have developed a mind-controlled robotic hand that allows people with certain types of spinal injuries to perform everyday tasks such as using a fork or drinking from a cup.

The low-cost device was tested in Spain on six people with quadriplegia affecting their ability to grasp or manipulate objects.

By wearing a cap that measures electric brain activity and eye movement the users were able to send signals to a tablet computer that controlled the glove-like device attached to their hand.

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Participants in the small-scale study were able to perform daily activities better with the robotic hand than without, according to results published Tuesday in the journal Science Robotics.

The principle of using brain-controlled robotic aids to assist people with quadriplegia isn’t new. But many existing systems require implants, which can cause health problems, or use wet gel to transmit signals from the scalp to the electrodes. The gel needs to be washed out of the user’s hair afterward, making it impractical in daily life.

“The participants, who had previously expressed difficulty in performing everyday tasks without assistance, rated the system as reliable and practical, and did not indicate any discomfort during or after use,” the researchers said.

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It took participants just 10 minutes to learn how to use the system before they were able to carry out tasks such as picking up potato chips or signing a document.

According to Surjo R. Soekadar, a neuroscientist at the University Hospital Tuebingen in Germany and lead author of the study, participants represented typical people with high spinal cord injuries, meaning they were able to move their shoulders but not their fingers.

There were some limitations to the system, though. Users had to have sufficient function in their shoulder and arm to reach out with the robotic hand. And mounting the system required another person’s help.

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Jan Schwab, an expert on spinal cord injury at Berlin’s Charite hospital who wasn’t involved in the research, called it an interesting pilot study that needs to be followed up with further clinical tests.

“Bigger studies will be very important to find out which patients respond well, less well or not at all,” Schwab said.

Soekadar said the system could be brought to market within two years at a cost of between 5,000 and 10,000 euros ($5,370 to $10,740), depending on functionality.

The device could also be used to help re-train the brain of stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation, he said. (VOA)