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Sudan Stops 13 Diplomatic and 4 Consular Missions Due to Financial Crisis

Al-Bashir issued a decree on Wednesday to restructure Sudan's external representation and directed the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to close select diplomatic and consular missions abroad, Xinhua news agency reported citing the official Sudan News Agency.

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Omar al Bashir, President of Sudan, wikimedia commons

Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir has announced closure of 13 diplomatic and four consular missions abroad due to a financial crisis.

Al-Bashir issued a decree on Wednesday to restructure Sudan’s external representation and directed the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to close select diplomatic and consular missions abroad, Xinhua news agency reported citing the official Sudan News Agency.

Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir has announced closure of 13 diplomatic missions and four consular missions abroad due to a financial crisis.
Omar al Bashir, wikimedia commons

The decree also directed to have a one-man ambassador in seven diplomatic missions.

In April, then Foreign Minister Ibrahim Ghandour had said that Sudan was unable to finance its diplomatic missions abroad and some diplomats have to return home.

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“For months, Sudanese diplomats have not received salaries and there is also a delay in paying rent for diplomatic missions,” Ghandour said, prior to being fired by Al-Bashir on April 19.

Sudan, hit by widening economic problems, has been suffering a foreign currency shortage since January 2018. (IANS)

 

Next Story

NASA Selects Missions to Study Sun, its Effects on Space Weather

One of the selected missions will study how the Sun drives particles and energy into the solar system

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NASA, Missions, Sun
The launch date for the two missions is no later than August 2022, the US space agency said in a statement on Friday. Pixabay

NASA has selected two new missions to study the Sun and its dynamic effects on space weather.

The launch date for the two missions is no later than August 2022, the US space agency said in a statement on Friday.

One of the selected missions will study how the Sun drives particles and energy into the solar system and a second will study the Earth’s response.

“These missions will do big science, but they’re also special because they come in small packages, which means that we can launch them together and get more research for the price of a single launch,” said Thomas Zurbuchen, Associate Administrator for the Science Mission Directorate at NASA headquarters in Washington.

NASA, Missions, Sun
NASA has selected two new missions to study the Sun and its dynamic effects on space weather. Pixabay

The Sun generates a vast outpouring of solar particles known as the solar wind, which can create a dynamic system of radiation in space called space weather.

Near Earth, where such particles interact with our planet’s magnetic field, the space weather system can lead to profound impact on human interests, such as astronauts’ safety, radio communications, GPS signals and utility grids on the ground.

The more we understand what drives space weather and its interaction with the Earth and lunar systems, the more we can mitigate its effects – including safeguarding astronauts and technology crucial to NASA’s Artemis programme to the Moon.

One of the two missions that NASA has selected is the Polarimeter to Unify the Corona and Heliosphere, or PUNCH. This mission will focus directly on the Sun’s outer atmosphere, the corona, and how it generates the solar wind.

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The second mission is Tandem Reconnection and Cusp Electrodynamics Reconnaissance Satellites, or TRACERS. The TRACERS investigation was partially selected as a NASA-launched rideshare mission, meaning it will be launched as a secondary payload with PUNCH.

TRACERS will observe particles and fields at the Earth’s northern magnetic cusp region – the region encircling the Earth’s pole, where our planet’s magnetic field lines curve down towards the Earth, NASA said. (IANS)