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Sudan: Strikers Push Military to Give Up Power

Chanting anti-government slogans, workers lined up outside the upscale al-Waha shopping center in downtown Khartoum

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Sudan, Striker, Miltary, Power
Susana Abdalla Hassan, an employee of Bank of Khartoum, holds a sign supporting the revolution while striking outside Al-Waha mall, in Khartoum, Sudan, May 28, 2019. VOA

Chanting anti-government slogans, workers lined up outside the upscale al-Waha shopping center in downtown Khartoum, demanding an end to the country’s 30-year military rule.

“Our martyrs lost their lives,” they shouted, referring to the dozens of people killed since December in Sudan’s revolution. “We can lose our jobs.”

Tuesday was the first day of a two-day nationwide strike called by opposition leaders demanding that Sudan’s military junta transfer power to a civilian government. The junta took power in April following the ouster of longtime president Omar al-Bashir after months of street protests.

Bashir had ruled for nearly 30 years and was accused of human rights abuses and corruption.

Sudan, Striker, Miltary, Power
An employee of mobile phone company MTN holds a flyer supporting a general strike which he hands out to potential customers before turning them away, in Khartoum, Sudan, May 28, 2019. VOA

An alliance of unions, professional organizations, and political parties called the strike. Talks between the alliance and the military council, which took power in an April coup, collapsed earlier this month after soldiers attacked peaceful demonstrators in the city, killing several and wounding hundreds.

The talks had stalled over whether civilians or generals would have control of a sovereign council meant to run the country for the next three years before elections.

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With talks deadlocked, leaders of Sudan’s protest movement said they are escalating their pressure on the military, starting with the strike.

Outside al-Waha mall, Idris Ibrahim, a teller at the Bank of Khartoum, said the Sudanese people are growing impatient.

“We want a civilian government,” he said. “The military council has had the country for almost 50 days now. We’ve had negotiations, but they don’t seem to want to give us our civilian government.”

Around the nation, workers in various sectors posted photos of themselves on social media holding signs supporting the strike, including oil workers, dentists, sugar processing employees, cement factory workers, and veterinarians.

Sudan, Striker, Miltary, Power
Staff of Sena supermarket hold signs supporting the revolution while refusing to work during a strike, in Khartoum, Sudan, May 28, 2019. VOA

Numerous international flights to Sudan were also cancelled as aviation employees threatened to strike.

The broad support for the protest was despite the rejection of the strike by of the opposition Umma Party, a member of the opposition alliance, which had raised fears of a split in the civilian movement.

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Back at al-Waha mall, Ibrahim said the upper management of his bank was totally against the strike. A few steps away, his colleague Susana Abdalla Hassan said her bosses’ stance didn’t matter to her.

“I don’t care,” she said. “Even if they fire me, it’s a small tax for the country. There are people who have lost their lives. The job is nothing.”

Inside the mall, many shops remained open, but employees supported the strike by refusing to do any work.

At a shop of the MTN mobile phone company, staff politely turned away any potential customers away at the door, handing small pieces of paper explaining their support for the strike.
Sudan, Striker, Miltary, Power
Shopping carts block the entrance to Sena supermarket whose staff are refusing to work as part of Sudan’s general strike demanding the military hand power to civilians, in Khartoum, Sudan, May 28, 2019. VOA

At the Sena supermarket, employees lined shopping carts to block shoppers from entering.

Throughout Khartoum, most businesses appeared shuttered, except for small stores selling basic necessities and petrol stations.

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On one run-down block, Siddig Ibrahim said he managed one of eight stores that normally sell clothes, watches, shoes, and other goods. All of them agreed to close.

“We ask everybody who is not striking to join the strike. It’s for the nation,” he said. “Those who aren’t striking don’t represent the majority.”

On Ibrahim’s block, only one shop – selling ties, suits, and dress shirts – remained open. The owner said he opened his store because he had not heard of the strike, but added he would close up soon because he feared crowds of striking workers that had gathered in the streets.

There were no reports of violence from protesters by late Tuesday, but members of the military council earlier vowed to fire any striking government workers.

Sudan, Striker, Miltary, Power
Siddig Ibrahim holds a V for Victory sign, a symbol of Sudan’s revolution, outside his shuttered shop during the strike while one shop next door remains open, in Khartoum, Sudan, May 28, 2019. VOA

Video circulated on social media Tuesday appeared to show uniformed security forces arresting staff of an electricity utility. Sudanese electricians had otherwise downed their tools, but said they would ensure power supply to necessary services such as hospitals.

The Sudan Professionals Association, a leading member of the opposition alliance, also accused members of the military of entering the Central Bank and attempting to force employees to work.

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SPA spokesman Amjed Fareed condemned the alleged arrests, which he described as “illegitimate” and a “clear violation of political freedom of association.”

“The military council have to see the will of the Sudanese people, and accept it, and implement its previous commitment of handing over the power to a civilian government,” he said.

Fareed added if the military does not hand power to civilians after the strike ends Wednesday, the opposition alliance will call for further civil disobedience. (VOA)

Next Story

Greed For Power May Demolish The Democracy

Politicians compete with each other for power and this greed for power can demolish democracy

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Greed for power in politics may demolish democracy in India. Pixabay

By SALIL GEWALI

It is too disgusting that Shiv Sena is aiming for something which was nothing but an act of betrayal. Here the principles and ethos of the party are just sacrificed. The “chair” of Chief Minister is what the individual parties in Maharashtra are wanting so badly. And for this only Shiv Sena has severed its ties with its all-time ally BJP which emerged with the largest number of MLAs. Is it not the BJP with which Sena made the alliance before the election? Why so much bitter feelings after the poll result? Many past elections were fought on this mutual understanding. Sena had always taken pride and bragged about its power and clout as because the BJP was behind it. But now very contrary equation and chemistry are on display. NCP, Congress and Shiv Sena are sharing the ideas as opposed to the expectation of the whole electorate.

Democracy
Politics in India might lead to a sinking democracy.

One believes it’s Congress and its High common which Shiv Sena Supremo Late Bal Thackeray always disliked and ruthlessly held them up to ridicule. It was because they hold the opposing ideologies. But now his son Uddhav Thackeray kneeled down and sought the helping hand of those rival camps to walk the party through for the chair of Chief Minister. Going by the flood of comments on the social media, this party has ostensibly fallen from the grace. BJP is not a holy cow either. It is equally good at flexes its muscles for the power.

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While Maharashtra is already under the president rule, the NCP and Congress now exploring all possible means to back Shiv Sena.   Uddhav Thackeray only wants to see his son Aditya Thackeray being the Chief Minister of one of the riches states in the country. The trend is not at all healthy. Here everything is utterly clear that the cherished values of democracy in India are fast eroding. Majority of the states in the country, only the “particularly families” are  always standing up to rule the roost. This is a bigger threat to the fundamental values of the country.The NATION is no more controlled by the government of the people, nor is it for the people. It is the government of the particular families which is formed for the fulfillment of the low greed and narrow aspiration of those particular families. Lastly, it is the common people who are always at the receiving end of the leaders’ whims and tantrums. Phew, the country is not at all in the safe hands.

Salil Gewali is a well-known writer and author of ‘Great minds on India’. Twitter: @SGewali