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Migrant workers have complained that as they are quarantined, they are suffering a lot. Pixabay

Thousands of migrant labourers are now locked up in over 3,000 quarantine centers in various districts. However, according to reports, arrangements for food and social distancing are inadequate in these centres.

In Banda district alone, more than 2,500 migrant workers have been quarantined in 12 of these shelters in the district.


Though Chief Secretary R.K. Tiwari claims that all arrangements have been made for medical screenings, food and stay of these quarantined workers, the truth is far removed.

In Muzaffarnagar, where over 1,000 workers have been quarantined in a shelter in BIT, one worker uploaded a video clip on the social media exposing the real state of affairs.

In the video, the man is saying that they were brought to the quarantine centre on Monday night and they were provided only about four food packets.


Migrant workers, labourers stuck at Delhi/Uttar Pradesh border near Anand Vihar. IANS

“The rest of us went without food. We were promised that food would be given but till late evening on Tuesday, no food was provided.

“Tea is selling outside the center at Rs 10 per cup and most of us do not have enough money. We are being treated like criminals when we are just workers displaced by our fate,” he said.

The worker also claimed that they did not have toilet facilities and were made to sit on the grass.

The district magistrate of Muzaffarnagar remained unavailable on phone and a junior district official said that arrangements were being made for those quarantined by them. He feigned complete ignorance about the workers at BIT.

Also Read- Can AI Predict Diabetes Accurately? Find it Out Here

The lockdown was firmed up from Monday evening when the Centre asked the state governments to stop intercity and inter-district movement.

A government spokesman, when contacted, said: “We are doing our best but we also face limitations due to lockdown. Our first concern is to screen the workers for coronavirus and ensure that they stay where they are.” (IANS)


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