Friday December 6, 2019

Start Chewing Sugar-Free Gums To Reduce Dental Caries

Researchers have found that chewing sugar free gums can prevent dental cavities

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Dental cavities
Chewing sugar-free gums prevent dental caries and makes your teeth healthy. Pixabay

To prevent your teeth from rotting, start chewing sugar-free gums, as researchers, including one of Indian-origin, have found some evidence that sugar-free gum could help reduce further development of dental caries (cavities) in adults and children.

Published in the Journal of Dental Research, the study from King’s College London revealed that chewing sugar-free gum not only reduce the advancement of dental caries, it could be used as a viable preventative agent, in comparison to non-chewing control methods such as oral health education and supervising toothbrushing programmes alone.

“Both the stimulation of saliva which can act as a natural barrier to protect teeth, and the mechanical plaque control that results from the act of chewing, can contribute to the prevention of dental caries,” said study lead author and Indian origin researcher Avijit Banerjee, Professor at King’s College London in UK.

Sugar-free gum can also act as a carrier for antibacterial ingredients including xylitol and sorbitol.

“No recent conclusive evidence existed prior to this review that showed the relationship between slowing the development of caries and chewing sugar-free gum,” Banerjee added.

dental, sugar-free gums
Chewing such gums can remove plaque and therefore prevent rotting of teeth and dental cavities. Pixabay

The research included analysis of studies published over the last 50 years, identifying 12 which explored the impact and intervention outcome of chewing sugar-free gum on oral health conditions, and in particular, dental caries on adults and children.

Sugar-free gum was found to reduce caries increment, giving it a preventative factor of 28 per cent.

In recent years, chewing sugar-free gum has emerged as a possible supplement to existing prevention strategies in stopping the development of dental caries.

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“There is a considerable degree of variability in the effect from the published data and the trials included were generally of moderate quality”, Banerjee said.

“However, we felt there was a definite need to update and refresh existing knowledge about sugar-free gum and its effect on dental caries and oral health. We are planning further research to determine the acceptability and feasibility of using this method in public health,” Banerjee added. (IANS)

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Brushing Teeth Frequently May Lower Risks of Heart Failure: Study

Brushing teeth 3 times a day can lower heart failure risk

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Brushing teeth
Brushing teeth is linked with improving the heart health. Lifetime Stock

Brushing teeth frequently is linked with lower risks of atrial fibrillation and heart failure, according to a new study.

Tooth brushing three or more times a day was associated with a 10 per cent lower risk of atrial fibrillation and a 12 per cent lower risk of heart failure during 10.5-year follow up, the research added.

The study, published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, enrolled 161,286 participants of the Korean National Health Insurance System aged 40 to 79 with no history of atrial fibrillation or heart failure.

“We studied a large group over a long period, which adds strength to our findings,” said study author Tae-Jin Song of Ewha Woman’s University in South Korea.

Previous research suggests that poor oral hygiene leads to bacteria in the blood, causing inflammation in the body.

Inflammation increases the risks of atrial fibrillation (irregular heartbeat) and heart failure (the heart’s ability to pump blood or relax and fill with blood is impaired).

This study examined the connection between oral hygiene and occurrence of these two conditions.

Brushing- oral health
Tooth brushing three or more times a day was associated with a 10 per cent lower risk of atrial fibrillation. Lifetime Stock

Participants underwent a routine medical examination between 2003 and 2004. Information was collected on height, weight, laboratory tests, illnesses, lifestyle, oral health, and oral hygiene behaviours.

During a median follow-up of 10.5 years, 4,911 (3.0 per cent) participants developed atrial fibrillation and 7,971 (4.9 per cent) developed heart failure.

The findings were independent of a number of factors including age, sex, socioeconomic status, regular exercise, alcohol consumption, body mass index, and comorbidities such as hypertension.

According to the researchers, while the study did not investigate mechanisms, one possibility is that frequent tooth brushing reduces bacteria living in the pocket between the teeth and gums, thereby preventing translocation to the bloodstream.

Also Read- Pharmacist-led Interventions May Prevent Heart Related Illnesses: Study

It is certainly too early to recommend toothbrushing for the prevention of atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure, the study said.

“While the role of inflammation in the occurrence of cardiovascular disease is becoming more and more evident, intervention studies are needed to define strategies of public health importance,” it added. (IANS)