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Sugar, spice and everything nice: Mahesvari Autar promoting Indian fusion in Netherlands

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Image Credits: totaalfotografie
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By Prerna Grewal

Music is stimulating, music is liberating, music has no boundaries, music has no limits. In short: music has no definition.

If boundaries and cultural diversity segregate people, art has the capacity to ironically employ the same diversity for  unification. This quality of fusion within music not only attributes brilliance to its melody but also unites leading composers, singers, musicians and artists situated across borders. The music that’s subsequently generated appeals to audiences all over and becomes a common ground for uniting music lovers.

Image Credits: totaalfotografie
Image Credits: totaalfotografie

The website DesiYUP.com, founded by Mahesvari Autar, has come up as a brilliant initiative that seeks to provide a platform to upcoming or unrecognized talent; talent that blends distinct flavours of music in a single composition.

The interview section of the website is particularly interesting. It Features interactions with artists  like Arijit Singh, Kiran Ahluwalia, Japjit Kaur, Kishan Amin, Nirali Kartik and Kartik Shah thereby also covering  their band Maatibani. The section offers an insight into their Journey and beliefs and also introduces one to some of their best works.

Image Credits: totaalfotografie
Image Credits: totaalfotografie

When asked about the factor that acted as a driving force in coming up with the idea of this website, the founder Mahesvari Autar, in a conversation with Newsgram, elaborated upon various interesting aspects regarding her journey and the birth of the website. Talking about the presence of a strong Indian Diaspora community in Holland, she conveyed how along with western, her interest in Indian music made her travel all the way to UK to seek her kind of music. This served as one of the crucial factors in making her come up with the idea of an international portal that covered and promoted independent artists who created their own music. While the website also covers artists who add their own touch to already existing Bollywood songs, upcoming artists indulging in cross over or Indian fusions are their major focus. She further cited MaatiBaani as an example. Appreciating the brilliance of the band, she commented upon their skill to fuse many aspects of Indian music in one song.

Desi YUP has also organized various concerts in Netherlands that promote cross over or Indian fusion. Some of the prominent ones include “Beyond Bollywood” featuring Arjun and Shweta, “A splendid afternoon” featuring Indian Classical vocalist Nirali Kartik and ‘Creation of Something Meaningful’ with Shammi Pithia and his band.

Like any other start up, DesiYUP also faced various hurdles. One of the biggest challenges was promoting completely unknown Indian artists in foreign lands; the other finance. Autar started off with her own savings for promotions and concerts and later worked intensively with cultural centers to stabilize financial issues.

Renowned singer Fredie Mercury had once remarked, “ We break a lot of rules. Its unheard of to combine Opera with a Rock theme, my Dear”. This website works towards tracking down such “rule breakers” and promoting their beats and melodies.

Image credits: totaalfotografie
Image credits: totaalfotografie

 

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YouTube Becomes The Most Used Application For Music: Report

This report also shows the challenges the music community continues to face.

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YouTube, Google
The YouTube Music app is displayed on a mobile phone in Los Angeles. VOA

If you are listening to music, chances are you’re on YouTube.

A music consumer report by the industry’s global body IFPI published Tuesday found that 86 percent of us listen to music through on-demand streaming.

And nearly half that time, 47 percent is spent on YouTube.

Video as a whole accounted for 52 percent of the time we spent streaming music, posing challenges to such subscription services as Spotify and SoundCloud.

YouTube
The content-sharing platform is also adding a tool, thus, allowing creators to add or remove non-skippable advertisements in bulk. Pixabay

But while Spotify’s estimated annual revenue per user was $20 (17.5 euros), YouTube’s was less than a dollar.

The London-based IFPI issued a broader overview in April that found digital sales for the first time making up the majority of global revenues thanks to streaming.

The report published Tuesday looked into where and when we listen to music.

It found that three in four people globally use smartphones, with the rate among 16- to 24-year-olds reaching 94 percent.

The highest levels were recorded in India, where 96 percent of consumers used smartphones for music, including 99 percent of young adults.

YouTube
YouTube music will separate the movies and music section on the platform. Pixabay

But music does not end when we put away our phones, with 86 percent globally also listening to the radio.

Copyright infringement was still a big issue, with unlicensed music accounting for 38 percent of what was consumed around the world.

“This report also shows the challenges the music community continues to face — both in the form of the evolving threat of digital copyright infringement as well as in the failure to achieve fair compensation from some user-upload services,” said IFPI chief Frances Moore.

The report noted that “96% of consumers in China and 96% in India listen to licensed music.”

Also Read: Google Maps Gets A New Update That Lets You Access Music

It did not, however, say how many of those consumers also listened to music that infringed copyrights.

Overall, the average consumer spent 2.5 hours a day listening to music, with the largest share of it consumed while driving, the industry report said. (VOA)