Tuesday November 12, 2019

New Study Reveals, Sugar-Sweetened Foods Can Worsen Your Mood

They suggested that rise in obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome in recent years highlights the need for evidence-based dietary strategies to promote healthy lifestyle.

0
//
sweet
"Our findings very clearly indicate that such claims are not substantiated -- if anything, sugar will probably make you feel worse," Mantantzis added. Pixabay

Contrary to popular beliefs that eating sugar-sweetened foods lift up low spirits, a new study suggests that sugar can worsen your mood.

Researchers discovered that sugar increases tiredness and lowers alertness within an hour after its consumption.

The idea of a “sugar rush” — sudden gush of energy after the consumption of sugar — is a myth, said the study published in Neuroscience and Biobehavioural Reviews journal.

“The idea that sugar can improve mood has been widely influential in popular culture, so much so that people all over the world consume sugary drinks to become more alert or combat fatigue,” said lead author Konstantinos Mantantzis from the Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany.

sugar

The idea of a “sugar rush” — sudden gush of energy after the consumption of sugar — is a myth, said the study published in Neuroscience and Biobehavioural Reviews journal. Pixabay

“Our findings very clearly indicate that such claims are not substantiated — if anything, sugar will probably make you feel worse,” Mantantzis added.

For the study, the researchers collected data from 31 studies, involving nearly 1,300 adults and analysed the effect of sugar on various aspects of mood including anger, alertness, depression and fatigue.

sugar

The idea of a “sugar rush” — sudden gush of energy after the consumption of sugar — is a myth, said the study published in Neuroscience and Biobehavioural Reviews journal.
Pixabay

Researchers are hopeful that their findings will go a long way to dispel the myth of the “sugar rush” and inform public health policies to decrease sugar consumption.

Also Read: Speeding Brings Costly Consequences

They suggested that rise in obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome in recent years highlights the need for evidence-based dietary strategies to promote healthy lifestyle.

“Our findings indicate that sugary drinks or snacks do not provide a quick ‘fuel refill’ to make us feel more alert,” said Sandra Sunram-Lea from Lancaster University.
(IANS)

 

 

Next Story

Study Reveals, Genetics Can Affect The Way in Which One Tastes Food

The study is scheduled to be presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2019

0
Genetics
Genetics affect the way you taste, and taste is an important factor in food choice. Pixabay

Genetics make certain compounds taste bitter, which may make it harder for some people to add heart-healthy vegetables to their diet, according to a new study.

“Your genetics affect the way you taste, and taste is an important factor in food choice,” said study author Jennifer L. Smith from University of Kentucky.

According to the researchers, everyone inherits two copies of a taste gene called “TAS2R38”. People who inherit two copies of the variant called AVI aren’t sensitive to bitter tastes from certain chemicals.

Those with one copy of AVI and another called PAV perceive bitter tastes of these chemicals, however, individuals with two copies of PAV, often called ‘super-tasters,’ find the same foods exceptionally bitter.

“We’re talking a ruin-your-day level of bitter when they tasted the test compound. These people are likely to find broccoli, brussels sprouts and cabbage unpleasantly bitter; and they may also react negatively to dark chocolate, coffee and sometimes beer,” Smith said.

For the study, researchers analysed food-frequency questionnaires from 175 people (average age 52, more than 70 per cent female) and found that people with the PAV form of the gene were more than two and a half times as likely to rank in the bottom half of participants on the number of vegetables eaten.

Bitter-tasting status did not influence how much salt, fat or sugar the participants ate.

Genetics
Genetics make certain compounds taste bitter, which may make it harder for some people to add heart-healthy vegetables to their diet, according to a new study. Pixabay

“We thought they might take in more sugar and salt as flavour enhancers to offset the bitter taste of other foods, but that wasn’t the case,” Smith said.

“Down the road we hope we can use genetic information to figure out which vegetables people may be better able to accept and to find out which spices appeal to supertasters so we can make it easier for them to eat more vegetables,” Smith added.

ALSO READ: Ram Mandir To Be Built In Ayodhya By 2022

The study is scheduled to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2019 — November 16-18 in Philadelphia. (IANS)