Friday February 28, 2020

Suicide Rates Increasing Among Self-Employed Than Unemployed

More self-employed committing suicides than unemployed

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Self-Employed suicide
More self-employed people are committing suicide every day than the unemployed. Lifetime Stock

It may appear strange but more self-employed people are committing suicide every day than the unemployed. People with their own startups are likely to be depressed.

It may be a testimony to the bleak economic situation and the slump in various industries that an average of 36 self-employed people ended their lives every day as against a lesser number of 35 unemployed people.

While the government has been offering several categories of loans for the self-employed, the downturn in commercial activity in general, indebtedness and the stress of running a business may be taking a toll on the self-employed. Self-employed category accounted for 9.8 per cent of total suicide victims (13,149 out of 1,34,516).

Suicides by the self-employed and the unemployed in 2018, with the two categories together accounted for 26,085 deaths during the year, according to government data. The self employed figure of suicides at 13,149 is more than the suicides by the unemployed at 12,936.

Both the categories combined outnumbered the suicide figures of those working in the farming sector at 10,349 in 2018, according to data compiled by the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB).

Self-Employed
The self employed figure of suicides at 13,149 is more than the suicides by the unemployed at 12,936. Lifetime Stock

“Each suicide is a personal tragedy that prematurely takes the life of an individual and has a continuing ripple effect, dramatically affecting the lives of families, friends and communities. Every year, more than 1 lakh people commit suicide in our country. There are various causes of suicides like professional/career problems, sense of isolation, abuse, violence, family problems, mental disorders, addiction to alcohol, financial loss, chronic pain etc,” says the NCRB adding it collects data on suicides from police recorded suicide cases.

A total of 1.34 lakh suicides were reported in the country during 2018, showing an increase of 3.6 per cent in comparison to 2017. The rate of suicides, which means deaths per one lakh population, also increased by 0.3 per cent during 2018 over 2017, the NCRB stated.

In a shocking revelation, one unemployed person committed suicide every hour during 2018. Of the total suicides, 92,114 male and 42,391 female, were reported in the country, NCRB’s data on “Suicide in India-2018” says.

The latest data, issued by the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) under Ministry of Home Affairs, reveals that a total of 12,936 unemployed persons committed suicide in 2018, which accounted for the 9.6 per cent of the total suicides, were of aged below 18 years to above 60 years.

Those below 18 years include 31 males and nine females while those between 18 and 30 years comprise 1,240 male and 180 female. A total of 868 male and 95 female were aged between 30 and 45 years. A number of 237 males and 21 females were aged between 45 and 60 years while 2,431 males and 310 females were above 60 years. Of the total suicides by unemployed persons, males are 10,687 while the females are 2,249.4

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Majority of 12.3 per cent suicides committed by unemployed persons were in Kerala (1,585 out of 12,936 suicides), 12.2 per cent in Tamil Nadu (1,579 suicides), 9.7 per cent in Maharashtra (1,260 suicides), 8.5 per cent in Karnataka (1,094 suicides) and 7 per cent in Uttar Pradesh (902 suicides). (IANS)

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Here’s How Chronic Job Insecurity Negatively Affects Your Personality

Job insecurity negatively affects your personality and can change your lifestyle too

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Job personality
Experiencing chronic job insecurity can change your personality for the worse. Pixabay

Experiencing chronic job insecurity can change your personality for the worse, say health and lifestyle researchers, adding that those exposed to job insecurity over more than four years became less emotionally stable, less agreeable, and less conscientious.

The study, published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, built on a growing evidence base about the negative consequences of job insecurity.

“Traditionally, we’ve thought about the short-term consequences of job insecurity – that it hurts your well-being, physical health, sense of self-esteem,” said study researcher Lena Wang from RMIT University in Australia. “But now we are looking at how that actually changes who you are as a person over time, a long-term consequence that you may not even be aware of,” Wang added.

The study used nationally representative data from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey in relation to answers about job security and personality for 1,046 employees over a nine-year period.

It applied a well-established personality framework known as the Big Five, which categorises human personality into five broad traits: emotional stability, agreeableness, conscientiousness, extraversion and openness.

Job personality
The negative effects of job insecurity on your personality are low self-esteem, less emotional stability and less conscientious. Pixabay

The study results showed that long-term job insecurity negatively affected the first three traits, which relate to a person’s tendency to reliably achieve goals, get along with others, and cope with stress. The researchers said the results went against some assumptions about job insecurity.

“Some might believe that insecure work increases productivity because workers will work harder to keep their jobs, but our research suggests this may not be the case if job insecurity persists,” Wang said.

“We found that those chronically exposed to job insecurity are in fact more likely to withdraw their effort and shy away from building strong, positive working relationships, which can undermine their productivity in the long run,” Wang added. Previous research has shown that insecure work – including labour hire practices, contract and casual work, and underemployment – is on the rise in Australia and globally.

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The HILDA data drew on responses from employees from a broad cross-section of professions and jobs, who were asked about how secure they perceived their jobs to be. The researchers said that types of job insecurity might include short-term contracts or casual work, jobs threatened by automation, and positions that could be in line for a redundancy. (IANS)