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Suicides highest amid young Indians in Malaysia

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Kuala Lumpur: The suicide count among youths in Malaysia is highest among males of Indian descent, a new study discloses.

“The suicide rate among youths was 1.03 per 100,000 population in 2009, accounting for the male gender (66.0 per cent), with Indians being the highest suicide completers (40.4 per cent and 5.6 per 100,000 population),” a recent study published in the Asia-Pacific Psychiatry journal has revealed.

suicide
“The most-common method of suicide was hanging (56.6 per cent) followed by self-poisoning (15.1 per cent),” malaysiandigest.com news portal reported, citing the study.

Another study, published in The Scientific World Journal in 2014, had echoed the same, saying that the Indian population in Malaysia makes up the largest percentage of people who attempt suicide.

The article said from 1969 to 2011, Indians had the highest suicide attempt rates at 3.67 per 100,000. The Chinese followed at 2.44 per 100,000 and Malays had rates as low as 0.32 per 100,000.

“Some of the risk factors among Malaysian Indians which could explain the higher number of suicide attempts in this group are poverty (a majority of Indians are from the lower social class) and alcoholism,” the researchers highlighted.

Photo credit: www.emirates247.com
Photo credit: www.emirates247.com

Also, psychiatry morbidity, caste issues, other social distress, cultural and religious factors and attitude to suicide contributed to the cases.

“On the other hand, it is much more difficult for Muslim Malays to attempt suicide since it is against their religion,” the researchers added.

“Education also contributed to some differences; 89 per cent of the studies showed that suicide attempters had secondary level of education compared to primary and tertiary,” researchers noted.

In 2015, some high profile suicide cases which grabbed media attention involved Malaysian Indians.

In May, an Indian journalist had jumped in front of a train and was killed.

In another case, a woman shot a video threatening revenge– in the form of killing her child– from her grave before committing suicide.

The video went viral and on the same weekend, her one-year-old daughter died.

With inputs from IANS

Next Story

Here’s How Poverty Linked with the Ageing Process

The study shows that the financially challenged also had higher inflammatory levels

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malnutrition
Experts demand actions against poor diets to eradicate any ways of malnutrition by 2030, a global goal set by the Agenda for Sustainable Development. Pixabay

Genetics, lifestyle and environment are all factors that somehow influence when and how we all age. Now, researchers have revealed that four or more years with an income below the relative poverty threshold during adult life may accelerate the ageing process.

For the study published in the journal European Journal of Ageing, the researchers have tested 5,500 middle-aged persons, using various ageing markers: physical capability, cognitive function and inflammatory level.

The results were then compared with the participants’ income throughout the 22 years leading up to the test. An annual income of 60 per cent below the median income is considered relative poverty.

“We have found that there is a significant correlation between financial challenges and early ageing. And this is important in order to be able to instigate preventative measures”, said study co-author Rikke Lund, Professor at the University of Copenhagen.

“With our results, we show that poor finances are a strong indicator of early ageing – this knowledge can be used to prevent the problems,” she added.

For the findings, the participants have been through both physical and cognitive tests, each of which is an expression of general strength and function.

Elderly women beg money at a pavement in Calcutta on 11 September 2012. India’s official poverty rate as per Planning Commission, stands at 29.8 per cent, or near to 350 million people using the 2010 population figures.

The researchers measured the participants’ grip strength, how many times they could get up from and sit on a chair in 30 seconds and how high they could jump.

“There is a significant difference between the test results. People who have been below the relative poverty threshold for four or more years in their adult life perform significantly worse than those who have never been below the threshold,” Lund said.

The results show that the financially challenged group, relative to the comparison group, can get up and sit down two times less per 30 seconds and that their grip strength is reduced by 1.2 kilos.

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In addition, the researchers have measured the inflammatory level of the participants.

A high inflammatory level is a sign that the body is in a state of alert and can likewise be used as a marker for illness and ageing.

The study shows that the financially challenged also had higher inflammatory levels. (IANS)