Monday August 20, 2018

Study Shows That Dogs Born in Summers Are More Likely to Suffer From Heart Disease

Owing to higher level of outdoor air pollution during summers, dogs born during this time are more likely to be at higher risk of heart disease, according to a study.

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Dog's hormone oxytocin sensitivity study. Pixabay
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Owing to higher level of outdoor air pollution during summers, dogs born during this time are more likely to be at higher risk of heart disease, according to a study.

For both dogs and humans, outside air pollution during pregnancy and at the time of birth appears to play a role in later development of heart disease.

 

Man's best friend
Dogs are among the most popular domestic animals. Wikimedia

 

Overall, dogs have a 0.3 to 2 per cent risk of developing heart disease depending on breed, but among those that are genetically predisposed to the heart disease, the birth month difference in risk was found to be marginal.

However, breeds not genetically predisposed to the disease, such as Norfolk terrier, Berger Picard, American Staffordshire terrier, English toy spaniel, Bouvier des flandres, Border terrier and Havanese were also found to be at highest risk.

This suggests that the effect supports an environmental mechanism, the researchers said, in a paper published in the journal Scientific Reports.

The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, also supports earlier findings in humans pointing to the role of early gestational exposure to fine air particulates and increased risk of heart disease later in life.

 

People raised in cities without pets at risk from mental illness
People raised in cities without pets at risk from mental illness. Pixabay

“It’s important to study dogs because the canine heart is a remarkably similar model to the human cardiovascular system,” said Mary Regina Boland, Assistant Professor at the University of Pennsylvania in the US.

“Also, humans and dogs share their lives together and are exposed to similar environmental effects, so seeing this birth season-cardiovascular disease relationship in both species illuminates mechanisms behind this birth-season disease relationship,” Boland added.

Because dogs’ pregnancies are shorter than humans (lasting only 2 months), pollution as a possible mechanism is still thought to be through the mother’s inhalation of air pollution effecting the uterine environment, which in turn affects the developing cardiovascular system of the baby or puppy, the study showed.

For the new study, the team examined 129,778 canines encompassing 253 different breeds.

Also Read: Study Shows, Dogs of 8 Weeks of Age are Found Most Attractive by Humans

The research team found that risk climbs to the greatest level in dogs born in July, who have a 74 per cent greater risk of heart disease than would typically be expected. (IANS)

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Omega-3 Supplements do not Protect Against Heart Disease: Study

Intake of omega 3 fats (including EPA and DHA), primarily through supplements, probably makes little or no difference to risk of cardiovascular events, coronary heart deaths, coronary heart disease events, stroke or heart irregularities

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Eating more ALA -- an essential fatty acid and important part of a balanced diet -- through food or supplements probably decreases the risk of heart irregularities from 3.3 to 2.6 per cent.
Eating more ALA -- an essential fatty acid and important part of a balanced diet -- through food or supplements probably decreases the risk of heart irregularities from 3.3 to 2.6 per cent. (IANS)

Taking omega 3 through food or supplements is likely to have little or no effect on our risk of experiencing heart diseases, stroke or death, a new study challenging previously held theories says.

Increased consumption of omega 3 — a type of fat normally found in plant foods like walnuts, rapeseed as well as in fatty fish such as salmon and cod liver oil — has been widely promoted because of a common belief that it will protect against heart diseases.

However, the findings, published in the Cochrane Library, showed that the risk of death from any cause was 8.8 per cent in people who had increased their intake of omega 3 fats, compared with 9 per cent in people who did not.

Intake of omega 3 fats (including EPA and DHA), primarily through supplements, probably makes little or no difference to risk of cardiovascular events, coronary heart deaths, coronary heart disease events, stroke or heart irregularities.

“We can be confident in the findings of this review which go against the popular belief that long-chain omega 3 supplements protect the heart… we don’t see protective effects,” said lead author Lee Hooper from the University of East Anglia, UK.

Medicinal drugs rich of omega 3
Medicinal drugs rich of omega 3. Pixabay

“The review provides good evidence that taking long-chain omega 3 (fish oil, EPA or DHA) supplements does not benefit heart health or reduce our risk of stroke or death from any cause.

“On the other hand, while oily fish is a healthy food, it is unclear from the small number of trials whether eating more oily fish is protective of our hearts,” Hooper said.

Eating more ALA — an essential fatty acid and important part of a balanced diet — through food or supplements probably decreases the risk of heart irregularities from 3.3 to 2.6 per cent.

Also Read: Omega-3 Fatty acids in Diet can Prevent Cancer From Spreading

However, the reductions are very small — 143 people would need to increase their ALA intake to prevent one person developing arrhythmia and 1,000 people to prevent one person dying of coronary heart disease or experiencing a cardiovascular event, Hooper said.

The study combines the results of seventy-nine randomized trials involving 1,12,059 people from North America, Europe, Australia and Asia. (IANS)