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‘Super 30’ Founder Anand Kumar Urges Indians in Canada to Join Hands for Country’s Progress

Anand Kumar runs the ‘Super-30’ programme in India for talented students from underprivileged background and provides them free mentoring

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Anand kumar super 30
Anand kumar super 30. Wikimedia

Vancouver, Sep 05, 2017: ‘Super 30’ founder and mathematician Anand Kumar has urged Indians in Canada to contribute to their native country’s progress in whatever way they could.

“With such a large number of successful Indians in different fields here, India can bank on it and hope to use this vast expertise for its progress,” Kumar said.

He was speaking at the grand finale of ‘Namaste Canada’ programme, organised by 20 big Indian groups in association with the Indian Embassy, on Monday.

He said distance would not matter in this digital era, but passion and commitment would.

Also Read: Connecting Indian Diaspora to Motherland: AP Janmabhoomi Project Works Towards Making Digitization of Education a Reality 

He said there were abundant opportunities in the fields of education, healthcare and skill development in India, which had a young workforce below 35 years of age comprising more than half its total population.

In India, Kumar runs the ‘Super-30’ programme for talented students from underprivileged background and provides them free mentoring.

So far, over 400 of his students have made it to the Indian Institutes of Technology. (IANS)

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New Medicine That Could Replace Insulin Injections

The tip of the needle is made of nearly 100 per cent compressed, freeze-dried insulin. 

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The tip of the needle is made of nearly 100 per cent compressed, freeze-dried insulin. Pixabay

Researchers have developed a drug capsule that could be used to deliver oral doses of insulin, potentially replacing injections for patients with Type-2 diabetes, says a new study.

About the size of a blueberry, the capsule contains a single and small needle made of compressed insulin, which is injected after the capsule reaches the stomach.

The study showed that the capsule could deliver enough insulin to lower blood sugar to levels comparable to those produced by injections given through skin. They also demonstrated that the device can be adapted to deliver other protein drugs.

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About the size of a blueberry, the capsule contains a single and small needle made of compressed insulin, which is injected after the capsule reaches the stomach. VOA

“We are really hopeful that this new type of capsule could someday help diabetic patients and perhaps anyone who requires therapies that can now only be given by injection or infusion,” said Robert Langer, Professor at the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research in Britain.

The tip of the needle is made of nearly 100 per cent compressed, freeze-dried insulin.

When the capsule is swallowed, water in the stomach dissolves the sugar disk, releasing the spring and injecting the needle into the stomach wall.

The stomach wall has no pain receptors, so the patients would not be able to feel the prick of the injection. To ensure that the drug is injected into the stomach wall, the researchers designed their system so that no matter how the capsule lands in the stomach, it can orient itself so the needle is in contact with the lining of the stomach.

The findings, published in the journal Science, showed that the researchers could successfully deliver up to 300 micrograms of insulin.

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The type of drug delivery could be useful for any protein drug that normally has to be injected, such as immunosuppressants used to treat rheumatoid arthritis or inflammatory bowel disease and may also work for nucleic acids such as DNA and RNA, according to the researchers. Pixabay

More recently, they have been able to increase the dose to 5 milligrams, which is comparable to the amount that a patient with Type-2 diabetes would need to inject.

Also Read: A New Hope for Acute Liver Failure Patients

Furthermore, no adverse effects from the capsule was found, which is made from biodegradable polymer and stainless steel components.

Importantly, this type of drug delivery could be useful for any protein drug that normally has to be injected, such as immunosuppressants used to treat rheumatoid arthritis or inflammatory bowel disease and may also work for nucleic acids such as DNA and RNA, according to the researchers. (IANS)