Sunday May 26, 2019
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Super Tuesday on March 1: What does it mean for US presidential Primaries

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US Presidential Candidate

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton were the big winners Saturday, February 21 in the latest round of US presidential primary voting. Trump easily prevailed in the South Carolina primary while Clinton won a narrow victory over Senator Bernie Sanders in the Nevada caucuses.

The two now are in driver’s seat and have a psychological advantage over their rivals.
As you might know, Presidential elections will happen in November this year and the newly elected President will assume office in January of 2017, replacing Barack Obama.

What are Primaries or caucuses: As part of inner -party democracy, presidential aspirants have to fight among themselves to secure a ticket or nomination for the election from the respective party. These primary elections (called primaries or caucuses) are held state-wise in the US. So far, 3 primaries have happened- in Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina. From the Republican side, Donald Trump is leading, while in Democratic party primaries, Hillary Clinton is leading.

On Tuesday, March 1, 2016, as many as 11 states will hold primaries together, thus called Super- Tuesday. Naturally, who so ever winds, will be marching ahead with much more force and conviction.

As primaries keep going, candidates keep dropping out of the race. Typically, at some point, only one candidate is left in the fray with clear lead (or at least so much lead that trailing candidates see no point in contesting further)and the party nominates him/her for the Presidential elections.

Presidential elections in the US are long drawn battles and it takes a mammoth amount of money to contest. In the world’s strongest democracy, money makes the mare go, rest stand no chance how influential they may be. Without money, you do not stand a chance to be visible.

VOA National correspondent Jim Malone has a wrap-up of the Saturday voting from Washington….
The video is brought to you by NewsGram in collaboration with VOA.

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US President Donald Trump Raises a Possibility of Huawei Being a Part of US-China Trade Deal

The Chinese government denies stealing intellectual property and committing unfair trade practices

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tariffs, chinese imports
U.S. President Donald Trump delivers remarks on a range of subjects during an event in the Roosevelt Room at the White House in Washington, May 9, 2019. VOA

US President Donald Trump has raised the possibility of easing restrictions on Huawei as part of a broader trade deal with Beijing, despite labelling the Chinese telecommunications giant “very dangerous”.

The comments on Thursday, which appear to run counter to Washington’s hardline policy on Huawei, come just a week after the US Department of Commerce placed the company on a trade blacklist, effectively barring it from conducting business with US companies, CNN reported.

“Huawei is something that’s very dangerous” from a security standpoint, Trump told reporters on Thursday.

But then he floated the idea of using the Chinese tech firm as leverage in the ongoing trade negotiations with China.

“It’s possible that Huawei even would be included in some kind of trade deal,” Trump said. “If we made a deal, I can imagine Huawei being included in some form of, some part of a trade deal.”

In response to Trump, China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs spokesman Gao Feng said: “Recently the US is frequently using ‘long-arm jurisdiction’ to suppress Chinese enterprises. China urges the US to stop the wrongdoings to avoid further impact on the China-US trade relations.

US, Huawei CEO, China Ties
FILE – A man uses two smartphones at once outside a Huawei store in Beijing, May 20, 2019. VOA

“If the US would like to continue to talk, it should show its sincerity and correct its wrong actions.”

The US has long branded Huawei – the world’s largest telecommunications equipment maker and the No. 2 smartphone brand – as a security risk.

The Trump administration has been pressuring allies to restrict Huawei equipment in the build out of their 5G networks, citing national security concerns. Washington fears that Beijing could use Huawei equipment to spy on other countries, but has not provided any evidence that such acts have occurred.

Also Read: Google Duo Now Has Data Saving, Group Calls for Android

Huawei has repeatedly denied that any of its products pose a security risk, noting that Beijing has never requested access to its equipment and if it did, the company would refuse to comply, reports CNN.

The Chinese government denies stealing intellectual property and committing unfair trade practices.

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Thursday said the dispute over Huawei could deepen, reiterating the security risk posed by Huawei’s technology and saying he expects other international companies to elect not to use their products. (IANS)