Tuesday, September 22, 2020
Home Life Style Health & Fitness Survival Mechanisms In Brain During Uncertainty

Survival Mechanisms In Brain During Uncertainty

Researchers decode brain mechanism of taking risks

Israeli researchers have shed light on the survival mechanism activated in the brain in conditions of uncertainty, stressful conflict with a need to take risks.

The findings, published in the journal Nature Communications, may help understand the neural mechanisms in mental disorders that feature increased or reduced avoidance.

This may lead to future therapies for depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), or disorders associated with excessive risk-taking, such as addiction and mania.

In their study, researchers from Tel Aviv University (TAU) and Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center examined brain conditions of uncertainty and conflict over which course of action to take, in an environment of risks and opportunities.

Brain during stress
The main parts of the brain that are responsible for our reactions to stress include the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, the amygdala, and the prefrontal cortex. Unsplash

They identified the areas of the brain responsible for the delicate balance between desiring gain and avoiding potential loss along the way.

It was found that the human brain is affected more by a prior experience of failure or punishment than a positive experience of success and reward, something that encourages future avoidance of risk, reports Xinhua news agency.

Also Read: Facebook Builds New Smart Account Linking Tool

The study was performed among epilepsy patients who had electrodes inserted into their brains for testing prior to surgery to remove the area of the brain causing epileptic seizures.

The patients were asked to play a computer game that included risks and opportunities, during which the researchers recorded the electrical activity in their nerve cells immediately after they won or lost money after taking risks in the game.

It was found that the neurons in the area of the inner prefrontal cortex responded much more to loss (punishment) than to the gaining (reward) of coins. (IANS)

STAY CONNECTED

19,144FansLike
362FollowersFollow
1,774FollowersFollow

Most Popular

From “Confusion” To “Clarity” Regarding Sanatan Dharma With Dr. Chandra Shekhar Mayanil

Dr. Chandra Shekhar Mayanil is a Neuroscientist who is currently living in Naperville, Illinois. He has constantly been engaging in topics related to Yog...

Top 5 Beach Activities in Asia

Blessed with some of the most beautiful beaches in the world, Asia has something for everyone. From idyllic white-sand beaches fringed by palm trees...

Here’s Why You Should Switch to Contact Lenses, and It’s Not Just About Looks

Traditionally, we use eyeglasses for correcting vision problems such as near-sightedness (myopia) and far-sightedness (hyperopia). Glasses are both affordable and convenient to wear for...

This Indian Couple Run Street-Side Classes For Poor And Needy Children

On a quiet road in India's capital, tucked away on a wide, red-bricked sidewalk, children set adrift by the country's COVID-19 lockdown are being...

Lockdown Taught Me Greatest Lessons of Life: Mouni Roy

Actress Mouni Roy, who will soon be seen in the digital film, London Confidential, opposite Purab Kohli, says that lockdown taught her some of...

“It is Important To Support Folk Artists and Daily Workers in Trying Times”, Says Popular Singer Shaan

Popular playback singer Shaan says that folk artists and daily workers are keeping the music heritage and industry intact, and it's crucial for the...

Here’s How The Art of “Writing” Became an Empowerment Tool For These Female Authors

By Siddhi Jain Being a female author can come with its own set of challenges, especially when one is trying to juggle a career in...

Self-Driving Cars To Navigate Rush Hour Traffic On This Planet: NASA

A laser-based technology designed to help spacecraft land on a proverbial dime for missions to the Moon and Mars is also helping self-driving cars...

Recent Comments