Tuesday September 17, 2019

Suspending Students Serve as Negative Turning Point in Adolescence; Makes Them More Prone to Hold Guns, Sell Drugs

Mowen and colleagues studied to what extent being suspended from middle and high school was a turning point that led to more deviant behaviour

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suspending students, drugs
Offending was defined as attacking or assaulting someone, possessing a gun, selling illegal substances, destroying property and stealing. Pixabay

Suspending students from school can do more harm than good, said researchers, suggesting that suspending students can serve as a negative and harmful turning point in adolescence, resulting in more crime like assaults, stealing and selling drugs in the neighbourhood.

The study by researchers at Bowling Green State University and Eastern Kentucky University and published in Justice Quarterly found that rather than decreasing subsequent offending, school suspensions increase such behaviour.

“Intensifying disciplinary strategies — what some have called the criminalization of school discipline — may do more harm than good and could result in more crime in schools, neighbourhoods and communities,” said Thomas James Mowen, assistant professor of sociology at Bowling Green State University.

Mowen and colleagues studied to what extent being suspended from middle and high school was a turning point that led to more deviant behaviour. They also examined whether school suspensions, the most common response to youth’s misbehaviour at school, amplified the likelihood that adolescents would offend as they grew into young adults.

suspending students, drugs
Powder drugs. Wikimedia Commons

Offending was defined as attacking or assaulting someone, possessing a gun, selling illegal substances, destroying property and stealing. The study found that exclusionary school discipline (suspensions) increased subsequent offending, substantially amplifying deviant behaviour as the youth moved through adolescence and into adulthood. Repeated suspensions further amplified subsequent offending.

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The researchers took into account a variety of factors that influence offending behaviour, including whether youth dropped out of school, how youth felt about their schools (whether they felt safe, though their teachers were interested in them, believed school discipline was fair), how they felt about their families and their families’ income.

“The findings point to the need for school officials and policymakers to recognize the negative consequences of these approaches, examine the underlying causes of students’ behaviour and change how we manage that misbehaviour,” said Mowen. (IANS)

Next Story

Donepezil, A Drug Used For Alzheimer Disease, Doubles Hospitalisation Risk

Researchers have found that a drug, donepezil commonly used to manage symptoms of Alzheimer disease and other forms of dementia, is associated with a two-fold higher risk of hospitalisation

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Drugs, Alzheimer, Dementia, Hospitalisation, Risk
Dementia is a growing problem, with almost 10 million newly diagnosed cases every year around the world. Pixabay

Researchers have found that a drug, donepezil commonly used to manage symptoms of Alzheimer disease and other forms of dementia, is associated with a two-fold higher risk of hospitalisation.

According to the study published in the journal Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ), using donepezil increases the risk of hospital admission for rhabdomyolysis, a painful condition of muscle breakdown, compared with several other cholinesterase inhibitors.

Dementia is a growing problem, with almost 10 million newly diagnosed cases every year around the world, said the researchers.

Drugs, Alzheimer, Dementia, Hospitalisation, Risk
Dr. William Burke goes over a PET brain scan, Aug. 14, 2018 at Banner Alzheimers Institute in Phoenix, Arizona. VOA

“The findings of this population-based cohort study support regulatory agency warnings about the risk of donepezil-induced rhabdomyolysis,” said study researcher Jamie Fleet from McMaster University in Canada.

The study, led by researchers at Western University, looked at ICES data from 2002 to 2017 on 2,20,353 patients aged 66 years or older in Ontario, Canada, with a new prescription for donepezil, rivastigmine or galantamine, three cholinesterase inhibitors used to manage dementia and Alzheimer disease.

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The researchers found that donepezil was associated with a two-fold higher risk of hospitalisation for rhabdomyolysis, a serious condition that can result in kidney disease.

According to the findings, the relative risk was small but statistically significant. (IANS)