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Symantec Introduces ‘Email Threat Isolation ‘Technology to Block Email Attacks

The technology works by creating a secure remote execution environment between users and malicious content

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Symantec
Symantec. (IANS)

Cybersecurity giant Symantec Corp on Wednesday introduced a new solution based on threat isolation technology which blocks advanced email attacks on end user devices.

Named “Email Threat Isolation”, the solution helps protect users against spear phishing, credential theft, account takeover and ransomware attacks, the company said in a statement.

The email security solution with integrated threat isolation technology is designed to protect customers from the kind of sophisticated email attacks that have become more prevalent in the Cloud generation.

“Despite significant efforts by our industry to detect and block email-borne threats, messaging remains the primary vector for malware and scams within the enterprise,” said Greg Clark, Symantec CEO.

Threat Isolation Technology
Symantec Introduces Email Threat Isolation Technology. Flickr

“This revolutionary technology helps enterprises to quickly and easily isolate all malicious email content — both internal and external — to substantially reduce inherent risks within messaging applications,” Clark said.

The technology works by creating a secure remote execution environment between users and malicious content.

It sends web traffic from suspicious links to this remote environment, which confines all malicious activity, and only sends a safe visual representation of the content down to the user.

In addition, this solution can render such sites in read-only mode which prevents unsuspecting employees from disclosing sensitive information such as corporate credentials, according to Symantec.

Also Read-India Among Nations Most Prone To Cyber Attacks

“Further, because the technology is Cloud-based, organisations can be up and running quickly and easily, reducing stress on already taxed IT teams,” Clark added. (IANS)

Next Story

New Encryption Ransomware that Exploits Windows Vulnerability Identified

The vulnerability CVE-2018-8453 that the ransomware uses was earlier found to be exploited by the FruityArmor hacking group

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ransomware
The ransomware takes advantage of the architecture of the central processing unit (CPU) to avoid detection - functionality that is not often seen in ransomware. Pixabay

Researchers at cybersecurity firm Kaspersky have uncovered new encryption ransomware named Sodin which exploits a recently discovered Windows vulnerability to get elevated privileges in an infected system. The ransomware takes advantage of the architecture of the central processing unit (CPU) to avoid detection – functionality that is not often seen in ransomware.

“Ransomware is a very popular type of malware, yet it’s not often that we see such an elaborate and sophisticated version: using the CPU architecture to fly under the radar is not a common practice for encryptors,” said Fedor Sinitsyn, a security researcher at Kaspersky.

“We expect a rise in the number of attacks involving the Sodin encryptor, since the amount of resources that are required to build such malware is significant. Those who invested in the malware’s development definitely expect if to pay off handsomely,” Sinitsyn added.

ransomware
The vulnerability CVE-2018-8453 that the ransomware uses was earlier found to be exploited by the FruityArmor hacking group. Pixabay

The researchers found that most targets of Sodin ransomware were found in the Asian region: 17.6 per cent of attacks have been detected in Taiwan, 9.8 per cent in Hong Kong and 8.8 per cent in the Republic of Korea.

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However, attacks have also been observed in Europe, North America and Latin America, Kaspersky said, adding that the note left on infected PCs demands $2500 worth of Bitcoin from each victim. The vulnerability CVE-2018-8453 that the ransomware uses was earlier found to be exploited by the FruityArmor hacking group. The vulnerability was patched on October 10, 2018, Kaspersky said.

To avoid falling victim to Sodin threats, make sure that the software used in your company is regularly updated to the most recent versions, said Kaspersky researchers. Security products with vulnerability assessment and patch management capabilities may help to automate these processes, they added. (IANS)