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Shortage of semiconductors and steep hike in raw material cost hav e been a major spoilsport for the industry.

Challenges pertaining to electronic components' availability, coupled with high operating and ownership costs due to rising commodity prices dragged passenger vehicles' sales lower on a year-on-year basis in October. Accordingly, the sales of passenger vehicles fell to 2,26,353 units in October as compared to 3,10,694 units sold during the corresponding month of 2020 .

On a sequential basis, October's PV sales were higher than September's level of 1,60,070 units. The data furnished by the Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers (SIAM) does not include sales figures from some key players such as Tata Motors. The PV sales data comprises cars, utility vehicles and vans.

Segment-wise, a total of 1,03,829 passenger cars were sold in the domestic market in October, down from 1,82,692 units sold in the like period of 2020. The sales of other sub-categories such as utility vehicles (UV) and vans also degrew on a year-on-year basis. As per the data, UV sales fell to 1,12,112 u nits from 1,14,390 units, while the off-take of vans declined to 10,412 u nits from 13,612 units in the year-ago period.

In terms of two-wheelers, sales were lower in October 2021 at 15,41,621 unit s from 20,53,814 units sold in the like month of 2020. The overall domestic automobile sectors' off-take representing the sales of passenger vehicles, two-wheelers, three-wheelers and quadricycle fell to 17,9 9,750 units from 23,91,192 units sold during the same period of last year.

However, the data showed a YoY rise in exports. The overall exports, including PVs, two and three-wheelers and quadricycle rose to 456,698 units from 454,637 units during the same period of last year. "Manufacturers were banking on the festive season to recover from the severe drop in sales they have faced in the early part of financial year 2021-22," said Rajesh Menon, Director General, SIAM. "However, shortage of semiconductors and steep hike in raw material cost hav e been a major spoilsport for the industry." (IANS/ MBI)


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The ongoing global chip shortage and supply constraints are set to mar Christmas festivities for many tech firms.

The ongoing global chip shortage and supply constraints are set to mar Christmas festivities for many tech firms, especially gaming ones, which are reeling under tremendous pressure to deliver products on time. It is not just Sony and Microsoft's next-gen consoles that could be hard to purchase but several tech companies are feeling the pinch. Japanese giant Nintendo has revised its Switch sales forecast for the fiscal year down by 1.5 million "due to the effects of the global semiconductor shortage". The company is "evaluating alternative components and reviewing our designs", according to Ko Shiota, GM of Nintendo's Technology Development Division.

The gaming giant depends heavily on its console business, all the while deep-pocketed rivals such as Microsoft are expanding subscription and cloud gaming services. Nintendo further stated that it "plans to continue to expand its business around the core concept of creating unique integrated hardware-software products". Sony is reportedly struggling to make PlayStation 5 consoles and has lowered its production forecast for the current financial year. Valve's Steam Deck handheld gaming PC has been delayed by two months. "We did our best to work around the global supply chain issues, but due to material shortages, components aren't reaching our manufacturing facilities in time for us to meet our initial launch dates," Valve said in a blog post on Thursday.

According to a report in The Verge, Panic's Playdate handheld has been pushed from late 2021 to early 2022. The company said that "there are a number of other parts shortages we're trying to outsmart right now." Microsoft's Xbox chief Phil Spencer has already warned of ongoing shortages, saying that Xbox supply issues will last into 2022. Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger has said that the global chip shortage will linger for a lot longer, extending at least until 2023.

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The festive quarter may see a larger impact of chip shortage that is affecting the entire industry.

Apple, which took a massive $6-billion hit in its September quarter owing to supply constraints, has said that the festive quarter may see a larger impact from the chip shortage that is affecting the entire industry. In an earnings call late on Thursday, Apple CEO Tim Cook said that the primary cause of supply-chain-related shortages will be the chip shortage in the ongoing quarter.

"By the time we finish this quarter, the constraints will be larger than the $6 billion that we experienced in Q4 (July-September period)," he told the analysts. Apple faced about a $6-billion hit from the supply constraints, and it affected the iPhone, the iPad, and the Mac devices in its Q4 earnings.

"There were two causes for this in Q4. One was the chip shortages that you've heard a lot about from many different companies throughout the industry. The second was COVID-related manufacturing disruptions in Southeast Asia, "Cook informed. The Covid disruptions have improved materially across October to where we currently are, Cook said.

"So for this quarter, we think that the primary cause of supply-chain-related shortages will be the chip shortage. It will affect, or it is affecting, I should say, pretty much most of our products currently. But from a demand point of view, demand is very robust, " the Apple CEO mentioned. The chip shortage is happening on legacy nodes. "Primarily, we buy leading edge nodes, and we're not having issues on leading edge nodes. But on legacy nodes, we compete with many different companies for supply and it's difficult to forecast when those things will be normal," Cook elaborated. (IANS/ MBI)


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