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The platform, which is largely focused on photos and subjects' appearance, could have a negative impact on a substantial percentage of users.

By Sanjeev Sharma

A bipartisan coalition of several US state attorneys general has launched a probe into Meta Platforms, Inc., formerly known as Facebook, over the parent company's social media platform Instagram's effects on kids, Fox Business reported. The Wall Street Journal which first reported the investigation, said that there are at least eight states involved, and that the probe revolves around "the techniques used by Meta to increase the frequency and duration of engagement by young users and the resulting harms caused by such extended engagement."

In a statement announcing the "nationwide" investigation, Republican Nebraska Attorney General Doug Peterson said, "When social media platforms treat our children as mere commodities to manipulate for longer screen time engagement and data extraction, it becomes imperative for state attorneys general to engage our investigative authority under our consumer protection laws", Fox News reported.

two babies and woman sitting on sofa while holding baby and watching on tablet The probe revolves around "the techniques used by Meta to increase the frequency and duration of engagement by young users." | Photo by Alexander Dummer on Unsplash


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According to the global cybersecurity company Kaspersky, the extensive use of non-corporate communication services enables better connections but increases the level of risk from unmonitored IT resources.

At least 61 per cent employees do not feel isolated while working remotely, while 37 per cent of remote workers manage to communicate even better with their colleagues this way, a report said on Wednesday. According to the global cybersecurity company Kaspersky, the extensive use of non-corporate communication services enables better connections but increases the level of risk from unmonitored IT resources.

"Shadow IT solutions do not let security or IT specialists gain the complete picture of the company's digital infrastructure," Andrey Evdokimov, Head of Information Security at Kaspersky, said in a statement. "That situation results in increased risk because defenders do not consider unsanctioned tools when developing threat models, data flow diagrams, and planning," Evdokimov added. During 2020, people and organisations have been through many changes. The epidemiological situation and subsequent lockdown restrictions around the globe seriously affected the communication aspect of people's private and working life. The new conditions created different challenges and social isolation along with a lack of communication with colleagues -- these were among the most discussed concerns for remote employees.

While the majority of employees have successfully transitioned to the digital communications era, a substantial number of respondents could not adopt the remote way of life and still feel isolated (39 per cent) while working at home, said the survey that included 4,303 IT workers from 31 countries. Given the fact that loneliness contributes to employee burnout, not less than other demotivating factors like exhaustion and anxiety, this statistic should be a matter of concern for business executives. (IANS/ MBI)


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CCS Insight noted that geopolitical tensions related to Huawei's role in 5G rollouts led to delays, especially in western Europe.

The global switch to 5G is well underway, with the number of connections to the next-generation network set to reach 1.34 billion in 2022, says a new report. According to an analysis by market researcher CCS Insight, this year has seen connections to 5G triple to 637 million, suggesting that the roll-out of the network is continuing apace.

National lockdowns caused by the global health crisis in 2020 slowed network rollout, for example making it more difficult to send engineers on the ground to physically build the infrastructure, ZDNet reported. CCS Insight noted that geopolitical tensions related to Huawei's role in 5G rollouts led to delays, especially in western Europe. European countries were effectively hesitant to allow Huawei to provide critical infrastructure for their 5G networks after the Trump administration in the US raised concerns that the company might pose a security risk due to its ties with the Chinese government.

"The US being one country, the decisions were made relatively quickly while in Europe every country had to make its own decision as to what to do with Huawei," Marina Koytcheva, Vice-President of forecasting at CCS Insight, told the tech website. "In some countries, operators had to wait a little bit to see whether they'd be allowed to use Huawei equipment and in which part of the network. That was probably an even more significant delaying factor than Covid-19 in 2020," Koytcheva added.

Indias map with 5G written on it. One of the key reasons that deployment is accelerating is that consumers are now buying devices that are 5G-enabled in 2021. | Wikimedia Commons

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India may not see a billion smartphone users even by the end of this decade

India may not see a billion smartphone users even by the end of this decade and there are seven key challenges to achieve 100 per cent smartphone penetration, according to a new report. With the shrinking addressable base for smartphones, India is likely to have 887.4 million smartphone users by 2030, said the report by Gurugram-based market intelligence firm techARC.

The new smartphone user acquisition has been on a decline since 2018, after 4G drove switch to smartphones as it ushered several new use cases and forced feature phone users to upgrade. This, however, is not the case with 5G, which can substantially bring out a new use case for the mobile users compelling the feature phone users to move to a smartphone.

Affordability is the first concern even if users would discover their own use cases. "This is on account of both - investment in the device and the recurring data cost. Even to own a device, it's a substantial increase in the outlay for around 200-250 million users who cannot spent more than Rs 1,500 on a mobile device," said Faisal Kawoosa, Founder and Chief Analyst, techARC.

round gold-colored rupee coins and banknotes Even to own a device, it's a substantial increase in the outlay for around 200-250 million users who cannot spent more than Rs 1,500 on a mobile device. | Photo by rupixen.com on Unsplash

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