Tuesday December 11, 2018

Here’s How You can Take Care of Your Hair in Pollution

Chiranjiv Chhabra, Director and Consultant Dermatologist at Skin Alive Dermatology and Aesthetics also has some inputs to share:

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Don't let pollution affect your hair, skin. Pixabay
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With pollution comes the requirement to be extra cautious of your hair as the chances of it getting dull gets higher. Make sure you treat it well.

Pankaj Chaturvedi, Director, Senior Consultant Dermatologist and Hair Transplant Surgeon at MedLinks list down some steps to get rid of frizzy hair due to pollution.

* Take cover, wear a hat: Always carry with you a hat or hairband to protect your hair from damage. If you really can’t help being in a really polluted area, keep your hair covered if you can, (or tie it back).

* Wash your hair regularly: Fortunately, pollutants sit on the outside of the cuticle and so can easily be washed off, so in order to reduce the microbial content of the scalp and make it less itchy and prone to flaking, we recommends regular shampooing. For men, alternate days to everyday and for women twice or thrice in a week.

* Adjust your styling routine: Hair that has been exposed to excessive amounts of air pollution becomes damaged, feeling brittle and making breakage and split ends more likely. Keep this in mind when using heat from a straighter, curling iron or hair dryer. Minimize the amount of heat you use and always use a heat protecting product.

* Add back hydration: When in doubt, hydrate. It’s a good rule for your health and your hair. Jojoba oil is one good ingredient to look for as it both moisturises and strengthens the hair’s natural hydro-lipid layer, which coats the hair to help keep it hydrated.

* Deep condition: Start a deep conditioning routine weekly. Deep conditioners are used to repair damaged hair, penetrating deep into the hair hydrating and repairing it.

What's Under The Hat? Hair Tips For Women
Always carry with you a hat or hairband to protect your hair from damage. Pixabay

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Chiranjiv Chhabra, Director and Consultant Dermatologist at Skin Alive Dermatology and Aesthetics also has some inputs to share:

* Oil your hair regularly and properly: You should regularly oil your hair as it nourishes the scalp, cleanses dirt and dead cells. Almond oil is an effective hair cleanser, keeps hair healthy and facilitates hair growth as it is rich in Vitamin E.

* Try some do it yourself hair masks

* Ingredients: 1 Banana (it nourishes and repairs hair); Whole milk (moisturizer); Cocoa Powder – 2 teaspoons (moisturizes)

Method:

* Step 1- Peel and break the banana and put them into the bowl, mash the whole banana with a fork to get a fine pulp.

* Step 2 – Add enough whole milk to thin out the banana mixture. Add two teaspoons of cocoa powder, wisk all the ingredients in the bowl to form a nice smooth paste.

shampoo
Washing hair with shampoo almost every day makes it dry. Pixabay

* Step 3 – Apply the mask on dry hair with a dye brush, and leave it for 20-30 minutes once a week with a dye brush to get perfect results.

* Step 4 – Wash your hair with a cleansing mild shampoo and let air dry your hair.

Also Read- Apple in Court Battle Over App Store

* Usage of right shampoo and conditioner: You should always use a shampoo according to your hair type. If your hair is oily and greasy then you should use oil-free shampoos which will make your hair less oily. For dry hair, you should always use a conditioner or a moisturizing shampoo to protect your hair from frizzing up.

* Add extra protection for your hair: You should keep your scalp well protected in terms of both physical protection and nourishment before stepping out of the house. You can use a sunscreen serum or spray to protect your hair from harmful UV rays and toxins. (IANS)

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Air Pollution Worsens In Western Balkan Cities

Activists say the funds allocated are insufficient and that the government's response is inadequate.

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Smog, Air pollution
General view of the city as smog blankets Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina. VOA

When winter arrives in the Western Balkans, it is not unusual for dense smog to envelop its cities, making it hard to breathe and impairing visibility. But this year, air pollution levels are among the highest in the world and public anger is on the rise.

In recent days, the Bosnian, Macedonian and Kosovar capitals topped the charts of the world’s most polluted cities as the smog intensified due to heavy traffic, excessive use of coal, poor spatial planning and solid fuel based heating.

The air quality index measured by the U.S. Embassy in Sarajevo hit 383 on Tuesday, a level identified by the World Health Organization (WHO) as hazardous to health and almost 10 times the average. In Pristina, the index registered 415 on Monday night and marked air quality in several Macedonian towns as very poor.

“This is all the result of a situation in which political elites treat the city as a construction plot which should be occupied at all costs rather than a place where people live,” Anes Podic of Sarajevo’s Eko Akcija environmental group said.

global warming, air pollution, Asia
The sun is seen through evening air pollution, Feb. 8, 2018. VOA

“You can feel how bad the air smells even inside the car or home,” said a taxi driver Mirsad Pobric.

According to the WHO, pollution costs Bosnia the equivalent of more than a fifth of its annual gross domestic product (GDP) every year — around $3.9 billion — in lost work and school days, healthcare and fuel costs.

Macedonia loses an equivalent of 3.2 percent of GDP a year to pollution, the World Bank said in a report, more than$360 million a year.

As a way of bringing more attention to the issue, the Embassy of Sweden has been using red lighting on its facade in central Sarajevo to reflect air quality each day. The deeper the red, the worse the pollution.

According to the WHO, 230 Bosnians die of air pollution per 100,000 citizens a year, compared to 0.4 in Sweden. The World Bank estimates that in Macedonia there are 1,350 deaths related to air pollution per year.

Air pollution
Sweden has launched a four-year project in Bosnia that will bring together experts from its Environmental Protection Agency .Wikimedia Commons

“Pollution is killing people of Bosnia and Herzegovina, therefore something really needs to be done,” Swedish Ambassador Anders Hagelberg told Reuters.

As part of efforts to combat the issue, Sweden has launched a four-year project in Bosnia that will bring together experts from its Environmental Protection Agency and local hydro-meteorological agencies and governments.

The aim of the program is to help improve air quality monitoring but also to bring more investment into energy efficiency.

Also Read: U.N. Chief Warns The World About Not Doing Enough To Prevent Climate Change

Macedonia has launched its own program to combat air pollution to which the government allocated 1.6 million euros ($1.83 million) in next year’s budget. It aims to halve Skopje’s air pollution within two years by reducing taxes for central heating, restricting traffic and introducing stricter control of industrial emissions.

Activists say the funds allocated are insufficient and that the government’s response is inadequate. (VOA)